Featured Posts

Our favorite post from the past week.

Vern Gambetta

The Continuum of Function

Movement is a complex event that involves synergists, stabilizers, neutralizers, and antagonists all working together to reproduce efficient triplanar movements. Therefore the basic foundational principle of functional training is to train movements not muscles. Sport scientist Roger Enoka put it best: “The function of a muscle depends on the context in which it is activated.” Different movements use muscles differently. The brain does not recognize individual isolated muscles; rather it recognizes patterns of movement in response to sensory input. The Central Nervous System is the command station that controls and directs all movement. The CNS calls for patterns of movement that can be modified in countless ways to react appropriately to gravity, ground reaction forces, and momentum. Each activity is subjected to further refinements and adjustments by feedback from the body’s proprioceptors. This process ensures optimal neuromuscular control and efficiency of function.

Training Blogs

  • Martin Bingisser

    The Swiss Hammer Throw champion and national coach talks about training and throwing.

  • Kibwé Johnson

    The US champion takes us along on the road to the 2016 Olympics.

  • Vern Gambetta

    A leader in athletic develompent, Gambetta wrties from experience across many sports.

  • Jason Young

    Olympic discus thrower and coach Jason Young shares his ideas on throwing and training.

  • Craig Pickering

    Craig combines his experience as an Olympic sprinter and a sports scientist to give a practical view on performance sports training.

  • Derek Evely

    Former Candian and UK training center director writes about training theory and organization.

  • Zac Brouillette

    Strength coach Zac Brouillette applies his athletics background to a variety of sports.