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GAINcast Episode 205: Nutrition science (with Stuart Phillips)

The fields of nutrition and anti-aging are rife with misinformation and hucksters. Professor Stuart Phillips, on other hand, is the one in the background finding the real answers and doing the research. He joins this week’s GAINcast to lay out what the research tells us on a variety of topics like proteins, aging, vitamins, hormonal response, and more.

HMMR Podcast Episode 238: Adapt and overcome (with the Melbourne Storm)

Sports around the world have been thrown into disarray due to the pandemic. The chaos brought some teams together and tore others apart. The Melbourne Storm seemed to get stronger as the year went on and just ended their 2020 campaign last month as National Rugby League champions. Performance director Lachlan Penfold and strength coach Dan di Pasqua join us on this week’s episode to look back at the difference makers for the team this year, as well as the evolving role of strength and sports science in the high performance model.

GAINcast Episode 204: Prepare for the game (with Eddie Jones)

Training is about preparing for the game. It’s a simple concept, but we often lose sight of that when we dive too deep into tactics, strength training, or other facets of training. English Rugby coach Eddie Jones tries to bring this concept to the forefront in his training. Everything they do comes back to the game. The structure of practice, the mental preparation, and fitness training all are designed with the game demands as the central focus. He joins this week’s GAINcast to walk us through is approach to preparing athletes.

HMMR Podcast Episode 237: Attentional focus (with Kevin Becker)

A succesful coach doesn’t just know the sport, they can communicate it. That often means helping athletes focus their attention in the right way on the right things. This is thought of as the art of coaching, but there is a science behind the art. Kevin Becker is a leading researcher in the area and our latest HMMR Classroom lesson explains the science of cueing, feedback, focus, and more. He joins this week’s podcast to give an introduction to the topic.

November 2020 in review: technology and sport

The site theme in November was technology and sport. Throughout the month we put together 5 new articles and 3 new podcasts from 7 contributors about how to effectively integrate technology into training. You’ll find all the links below, as well as highlights from our archive on the topic.

GAINcast Episode 203: Speed reserve (with Gareth Sandford)

Middle-distance running requires a unique interplay of aerobic and anaerobic energetics. Historically, however, research on the events has centered on the aerobic side. Physiologist Gareth Sandford has sought to correct that imbalance by looking in detail at anaerobic speed reserve. He joins this week’s GAINcast to discuss his work and look at how to profile athletes and develop individualized training for complex events.

Using technology to integrate testing, training, and teaching

As technology has become commonplace in training, more and more coaches understand how to use technology. But getting the most out of any technology requires more than that. It requires seamless integration with training. Dean Benton is a master of integrating technology in the training process. As our site theme this month is technology and sport, it is only appropriate to get the master’s take on how to combine the two.

HMMR Podcast Episode 236: Rethinking VBT (with Wil Fleming)

Velocity-based training has been gaining traction over the last few years as the technology becomes more affordable. Many of the resources out there, however, keep discussing the same old approaches to VBT. Weightlifting coach Wil Fleming just published a new book on VBT based on his experience using it in a sport that is based around the barbell. On this week’s podcast we discuss some of the methods he has tried out and how they can be adapted to other sports.

Navigating the technology paradox in sport

Technology is a good thing, right? When we evaluate technology we tend to focus on the benefits: what it can add. But the paradox of technology is that it often has hidden costs we do not see up front. Determining whether technology is good or not can be harder than it looks.