The break down: Dylan Armstrong and finding double support in the shot put

We started a series on HMMR Media at the end of last year that looks at breaks down the technique of top throwers through their own eyes. We started with a breakdown of Matty Denny’s discus technique. Up next is the shot put technique of 2008 Olympic medalist Dylan Armstong.

» Related content: Learn more about Dylan Armstrongs work with world champion hammer thrower Ethan Katzberg in HMMR Podcast 308.

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The break down: 3 keys to Matty Denny’s technique

We’re starting a new series here on HMMR Media focusing in detail on throwing technique. There are a lot of sites and YouTube channels that break down the technique of elite throwers. With this series we aim to do things differently: break down technique in the words of the athletes and coaches.

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Hugh McCutcheon’s lessons on championship behaviors

Hugh McCutcheon has won medals coaching both the men’s and women’s US Olympic volleyball teams, as well dominant teams at the University of Minnesota. More recently though he’s focus on helping develop coaches and is the author of  Championship Behaviors: A Model for Competitive Excellence in Sports.

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Can you be weak and throw 80 meters?

Can you be weak and throw a hammer 80 meters? Of course not. You need an engine capable of producing immense power. That’s both common sense and science. But then along comes along an example like newly crowned world champion Ethan Katzberg. Someone like Katzberg makes you question how the world works and all the assumptions you’ve made about throwing.

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In defense of speed ladders

As politics has become more polarized around the world, that mindset has spilled over into the training world. Mention abortion, immigration, or affirmative action and you’ll have to dig your heals in for an intense debate with no middle ground. In the training world, for some reason, topics like speed ladders have become similar hot button issues.

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5 ways to rethink your approach to injuries

To start off the year our site theme has been built around injuries: better understanding them, how to reduce them, and how to come back from them. We’ve gathered various perspectives on the topic, from physiotherapists to coaches and athletic preparation specialists. Below are a five key lessons that I’ve taken home from all the experts.

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Replacing prediction models with learning models


We often think about periodization and planning as a process of prediction. The longer I coach, the more I see we need to reframe periodization as a process of learning. The best coaches implement planning methods that allow them to learn. It took me too long to realize this distinction, but the sooner as coaches understand it, the sooner they can take their athletes to the next level.

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The top 5 periodization myths

Yesterday Vern and I put on a workshop about periodization and planning here in Zurich. Over the last decade we have seen more and more critiques of periodization come out. On the outside some of the cracks are starting to show in traditional approaches to planning. But at the same time coaches keep coming back to it. With that in mind we kicked off the day with looking at busting some myths of periodization. If know you where something has flaws, you have a better chance to address those in your own planning. Below are 5 major myths that coaches need to understand and address in order to improve their planning.

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A systems approach to calf complex injuries

At beginning of this year we penned our thoughts on the hamstring injury phenomena and illustrated how a reductionist approach to reducing hamstring injuries just doesn’t work. A complex problem can’t be solved by something as simple as getting stronger; it demands a more holistic interpretation. Below we turn our attention to a similar injury trend: injuries to the calf complex.

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Lessons on bounding from John Pryor

Bounding is a core component of track and field training and one of the most powerful forms of plyometrics. As with any powerful tool it is a double edged sword. Used effectively it can be one of the best tools to develop reactive strength. Used poorly it can hinder mechanics or lead to injury. In our latest video lesson, coach John Pryor looks in detail at bounding and discusses how he uses bounds effectively for his athletes. Below are four key lessons that I took away from him.

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