Warm up to play, don’t play to warm up

When I started coaching at the University of Wisconsin, our men’s soccer team always started the season in August by playing an exhibition against a visiting club from Germany. Despite the mid-summer heat, the German goal-keepers would be out on the field a good hour before the game, building progressively towards game-like movements at game pace. Read more

Training for strength and robustness with mini bands

I joined this week’s HMMR podcast to share some ideas with Nick and Martin on my approach to training. We spent a good deal of time talking about how I’ve rethought the role of the barbell in training and how this has led me to use different types of functional equipment such as the aquabag, kettlebell, sticks, straps, and more. As I put it during the interview: functional equipment asks your body what it can do; less functional equipment tells your body what it can do. Read more

Is that functional training or a circus trick?

An Vern always says, you shouldn’t try to mimic the game in training, you should try to distort it. During last month’s HMMR Media Hangout, another member asked me about how a coach knows when something has been distorted too much. The question got me thinking because this is an issue you see all around. At a certain point, if you distort things too much they start to get weird. Read more

Finding the athlete-appropriate plan

I was musing recently on concepts like “long-term athletic development,” “periodization,” and “adaptation” and I had a thought which I hope carries the idea of “athlete-appropriate” a bit further into the light. Adaptation is the tool we use to get better, but we have to know where we are adapting from and where we are adapting to first. What is are generally missing in our hopeful attempts to accelerate athletic progress with young people is not about the methods or tools, but about the awareness and full appreciation of the deciding factors that permit a coach to know what kinds of training are appropriate with individual athletes and what kind are not. Read more