Posts

HMMR Podcast Episode 94: Multi-Directional Speed (with Ken Clark)

Speed is key in every sport, but not all speed is created equal. In many sports, maximum speed is not the game changer. Instead, it is how fast you can respond to the opponent, change direction, and get moving again. In other words, multi-directional speed is often more important than linear speed. On this episode of the podcast professor Ken Clark explains the three elements of multi-directional speed, how it differs from other types of speed, and strategies to improve it. Read more

Speed Over Tonnage: Is It Worth the Sacrifice?

If you watched Christian McCaffrey at the NFL combine, you couldn’t help but be impressed. He was fast, explosive and agile. But nevertheless he had some critics as his weightlifting numbers were not impressive. Interesting. I know for a fact that Stanford University has employed velocity-based training (VBT) methods with their football athletes in the past. To what extent McCaffrey used VBT I do not know, but whatever combination of methods he used it clearly got him results on the field. Maybe lifting all the weight possible like a weightlifter is not the end-all-be-all to being a top athlete. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 91: Always Compete

Competition is a key to getting better and Pete Carroll has built his coaching philosophy around that. On this week’s episode we take a look in depth at Carroll’s coaching philosophy, its benefits, and its applicability in different settings. Plus we answer another question of the week. Read more

GAINcast Episode 53: American Football Then and Now

American football has undergone drastic change in the 50 years since Vern strapped on a helmet as a college lineman. New practice guidelines are finally trying to keep up with the changes to help protect players. But will they work? On this episode of the podcast we discuss how the sport is evolved and how practice must evolve with it. Read more

3 Keys to Winning Forever

Pete Carroll is a divisive figure. He stands there on the sidelines with a cheek of chewing gum, dad shoes, and a big smile on his face. Fans find his happy-go-lucky persona either endearing or grating. But no matter what camp you are in, you cannot deny the sustained success he has had at both the collegiate and professional level. As head coach at the University of Southern California he rebuilt a winning tradition, leading the team to two national championships and a record seven straight BCS bowl games. Since 2010 he has been with the NFL’s Seattle Seahawks where they have now won three NFC West Championships in four years, been to two Super Bowls, and won one. Read more

The Role of Specific Strength Exercises in Team Sports

A question that comes up nearly every time I present on specific strength exercises is whether such work in the weight room is really necessary for team sports. Athletes from these sports spend large quantities of time on the field and little time training off of it. As a result many strength coaches feel a need to balance out their training and focus only on general exercises once the athletes enter the weight room. I must admit, it is a great question. In fact, I’ve been pondering it for a few months now. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 72: How Speed Works (with Jonas Tawiah Dodoo)

We all talk about speed as if it were one simple thing, but it is a complex combination of factors. On this week’s podcast Speedworks founder and elite sprint coach Jonas Tawiah Dodoo walks us through the factors and discusses the nuances of training for speed in team sports and how to individualize speed training. Read more

Episode 23: What’s The Cost? (with Buddy Morris)

Knowing where you are going as a coach is essential, but you also have to know how you are going to get there. For example NFL players need to be explosive and need to train explosivity. But how should they do that? Olympic lifting? Jumping? Medicine ball work? Something else? Each method has its benefit, but they all come with costs too and as a coach you have to search for the ways to get the most benefit for the lowest price. And on this week’s episode we start by taking a look at this analysis with Arizona Cardinals strength and conditioning coach Buddy Morris. Read more

Situational Practice

This weekend, I witnessed via my television screen one of the biggest blunders in college football. The situation of course was the fumbled snap, the re-fumbled recovery of that snap, and the subsequent recovery of that fumble for a last second touchdown. Michigan State wins and beats Michigan in their big in-state rivalry, and one of the greatest rivalries in the history of the football. The person who fumbled that snap has a name, and his name is Blake O’Neill. After October 17, 2015, every Michigan football fan will know his name. @blakewoneill on Twitter, Facebook, and other social media outlets went crazy! The comparison of this young man’s blunder and Ray Finkle, the fictional character from the Ace Ventura: Pet Detective movie, are alive. I don’t know a lot about Blake O’Neill, but the little that I do know, and the bit of science has grown to help us understand performance, should tell us all he alone is not the only one to blame. Given his lack of situational experience any one of us could do the same thing, and the coaches had the primary responsibility to give him more situational practice. Read more

Training Talk with Tom Myslinski (Part 3)

Enjoy this training talk? Become a member to read more in-depth chats with top coaches from a variety of backgrounds like Dan Pfaff, Vern Gambetta, Derek Evely, Gary Winckler, Joel Jamieson and many more.

Eventually all talks have to come to an end. After chatting with NFL strength coach Tom Myslinski about his influences, training for football, special strength, and utilizing training feedback, we had to wrap things up. For the final part of the conversation we discussed new sports science trends in and some important training variables he sees. Check it out below along with links to the past two parts of the interview. Read more