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HMMR Podcast Episode 196: Send in the clowns

There is something wrong with strength and conditioning in American collegiate football. The field is being overrun by clowns, and no one is speaking up about it. A lot of trust has been placed in the strength and conditioning coach, but that has only caused more scandals rather than better athletes. Vern Gambetta joins us on this podcast to talk about the problems facing the field and potential solutions to move the profession forward. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 189: Reflective coaching (with Xavier Roy)

Coaches need to reflect and debrief, but translating the theory into practice can be difficult. Xavier Roy recently completed his PhD on the topic and as part of his research he worked hands on with a Canadian football team to see how coaches reflected on training, and what steps they took to implement changes. On this episode of the podcast he joins us to discuss his research and also share thoughts on training for football and current trends both north and south of the border. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 169: Reflections

Off-season training is about to start up in many sports. Like other coaches, we are putting our plans together and using this time to reflect back on how things went last year. On this week’s podcast we discuss what we’ll do differently next year in a few key areas like in-season training, periodization, progressions, and more. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – July 2018

Welcome back to another edition of Sports Science Monthly. This month, we take a closer look at monitoring post-match fatigue, the debate on hamstring muscle action, mindfulness, warming up, travel, and more. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 163: Coaching in the NFL (with Buddy Morris)

Training for the complex demands of American football can be a difficult task. Training within the constraints of the NFL is even harder. On this week’s episode Arizona Cardinals coach Buddy Morris joins us again to talk about coaching in the NFL, including the role of sports science, training loads, the impact of the collective bargaining agreement, and the state of the sport. Read more

May 2018 in review: training speed

The old saying goes “you can’t teach speed.” Or, I should say, that’s how the old myth goes. Not everyone can be Usain Bolt, but everyone can get faster and, no matter the sport, speed is crucial. Unfortunately the topic of speed is surrounded by gurus, myths, and misinformation. Throughout the month we have looked in depth at training speed by cutting through the bullshit and sharing best practices to help coaches learn how to train speed better. Read more

GAINcast Episode 117: Moving, fast and slow

Movement is the foundational feature of sport. If you can’t move, you can’t play. Heck, it’s the foundational feature of life. Looking back at history, if you couldn’t move, you wouldn’t eat. On this episode of the GAINcast we talk about the basic principles of good movement, building better foundational movements, and helping athletes connect them through training progressions. Read more

The importance of sprinting in injury rehabilitation

Start talking about sprinting and it won’t be long until you the discussion turns to hamstring injuries. Hamstring injuries are a major concern of any athlete that has to sprint. Soccer has a notorious hamstring problem, but they are not alone. Hamstring injuries are also the most prevalent form of non-contact injury within sports like athletics, American Football, rugby union, Australian Rules Football, cricket, and basketball. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 151: The big game (with Josh Hingst)

The Super Bowl is one of the world’s largest sporting events, with more than half of America tuning into the game. This year’s game was one of the most thrilling in history, with the Philadelphia Eagles scoring late to secure their first title. Behind the scenes, the Eagles are supported by head strength and conditioning coach Josh Hingst. On this week’s episode he joins us to give us a look at training in the NFL, current trends, and what the Eagles are doing to get even better. Read more

Correlations, causations, and multi-sport athletes

You’ve likely heard of the importance of athletes being exposed to a variety of different sports in order to increase their chances of success in their main sport. It’s widely reported that high level athletes tend to a have a multi-sport background, with 71% of NCAA Division 1 American Football players, and 90% of Division 1 runners being multi-sport athletes. A big news story in 2017 was that 30 of the 32 NFL first round draft picks were multiple sport athletes in high school. It appears that the correlation here is clear; being a multi-sport athlete in your youth increases your chances of success. But does it? Read more