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GAINcast Episode 13: Athletic Development

We need a revolution. We are involved with developing athletes, yet so many people are focused the qualities in our job titles: strength and conditioning. No single component of conditioning can be solely responsible for the athletic development of any team or individual. On this episode Vern makes the case for why we need to redefine our profession.

This Episode’s Question: Why should our profession change its name from strength and conditioning to athletic development?

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Lessons from Japan’s Win in the Rugby World Cup

When Japan beat South Africa I went back to my notes of Eddie Jones presentation at Global Coaches House in London 2012 during the Olympic games. In that presentation he detailed out exactly what their plan was and how they would execute it. It has been very interesting to watch their progress over the last three years as they worked the plan. It all came to fruition on Saturday with the win over South Africa. It was not a fluke win it was by design a combination of leadership with a clear vision and a deep understanding of Japanese culture and how to use that to their advantage. Read more

Transitioning to the Next Level

Earlier this week I had the chance to sit down with the Sports Conflict Institute (SCI) in Eugene to talk about something other than training: athlete transitions. SCI is an online resource for assessing, preventing, and resolving destructive conflict inside and outside the lines. With my experience as an athlete, coach, and attorney they had a few questions about how athletes can successfully transition from high school to college, and from college to the pros or business world. Read more

That’s what they do at the U

I continually and constantly see this – high school strength and conditioning programs that blindly copy university programs, especially in football. What they do at the U has nothing to do with what should be done with growing and developing athletes. Read more

Developing Athletes – Art & Science

This whole process of developing athletes is both an art and a science. This is a careful blend, not an either or proposition. In today’s world of rapid change and scientific advances it is easy to get caught up in the science and minimize the art. It is very important to strive to constantly achieve a balance. Coaching practice should be rooted in science, but ultimately it is practice-based evidence that is important. Read more