Posts

GAINcast Episode 126: The basics checklist

The basics are crucial in training. If you don’t get the basics right then everything that follows will be compromised. But with all the talk of basics, what exactly are they? On this week’s GAINcast we look in depth at Vern’s eight key components of the basics, and related training factors. Read more

Athletic development: the basics

When I was growing there was a TV program about two detectives on the LA Police department. It was called Dragnet, the main character was Sargent Joe Friday, Badge 714, his famous line was “just the facts” when talking to a witness. To paraphrase Sargent Friday in coaching athletes to be better it all comes down to “just the basics.” That being said I have come to the realization that there is often not a good understanding of what the basics are. Read more

Putting the art of coaching in practice

Earlier in the year Lee Eldridge asked me to write down four simple coaching points to help advise young coaches. Eldridge, a English performance coach based in Geneva, put my input together with coaches like Nick Winkelman, Dan Baker, and more into a piece on the art of coaching for UKSCA members. You can check out my responses below. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 123: Overlooked

Sometimes it is the simple things we miss that can be the difference makers. On this week’s episode we share 5 simple training ideas that are often overlooked. From single-leg movements to planning backwards, we discuss how each one can help coaches and provide examples of how they can be quickly incorporated into training. Read more

GAINcast Episode 85: Implementing the Basics

We often talk about the importance of the basics on the GAINcast, but what exactly are “the basics”? And how do we implement them and keep them an integral part of training? On this episode we share some best practices on the topic and practical examples of how coaches can keep the basics as the central pillar supporting their program. Read more

Body of Work

It is no secret that I am a big fan of late 1980s NBA basketball. In my opinion, these days are the apex of the league and one team had an unmatched zenith of competency and dominance, the 1985-86 Boston Celtics. The main catalyst for this team’s summit of competitive greatness was their leader, Larry Bird. Today many applaud Steph Curry’s work ethic and skill proficiency. While he is very good right now we should remember he was influenced by Kobe Bryant, who was influenced by Michael Jordan, who was influenced by Larry Bird. Read more

Trade-offs

An effective training program demands constant trade-offs. Every component of training cannot receive equal emphases. If one component is emphasized then another must be de-emphasized. Good training is often compared to a mosaic but in my mind that is much too static, it is more like a kaleidoscope, ever changing in a state of dynamic equilibrium. Read more

Nurturing The Athlete

An athlete’s development is an organic process. It takes time and timing of the appropriate stimuli for the level of the athlete’s stage of development. My father was a gardener and I remember the first time he took me to work with him, I was probably ten or eleven years old. As any youngster, I was impatient and full of questions. I wanted to know why this patch of garden had no plants. Read more

What Are You Really Doing?

Is what you are doing making your athletes better or is it just making them tired and predisposing them to injury? I have asked this question numerous times in this blog. I keep asking it because I see more highly specific work being done without the commensurate return in results and an alarming rise in training related or training caused injuries. The current trend is to be more sport specific in training. I get it to a point, but there are definite perils and pitfalls of uber specificity. You must ask yourself if you trying to be too sport specific? Read more

Vern Gambetta

Evidence

  • Evidence Based = Research
  • Practice Based = Experience
  • Effective coaching demands a blend of the two, the art and the science. The ultimate measure is reproducible results by resilient adaptable athletes in the competitive arena.