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Book Review: Periodization by Bondarchuk

Bondarchuk's new book on periodization is available from newtrainingconcepts.com

Before Dr. Anatoliy Bondarchuk moved to North America six years ago, not much was written about his research in English. But since then, many of his ideas have finally been translated. His first two major works in English discussed the concept  “transfer of training” (you can find reviews of those books here and here). In this respect, they focused on the finest details of training: the exercises performed each day. Some exercises transfer over to the competition exercise better than others, and he laid out data showing how different exercises correlate to different track and field events. Bondarchuk’s new book takes a step back and looks at the bigger concept of periodization across all sports.

Periodization, in short, is how you organize training throughout the season to help reach the athlete’s goals. In contrast to the first books, this volume does not mention one exercise and does not discuss how to build a training day or a training week. Instead it presents the methods in which training programs can be combined throughout the season for every sport.
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Book Review: A Coach’s Journey by Ken Foreman

Coach Ken Foreman with athletes from the Seattle Pacific University track team.

If you’ve been around the Seattle track community, you’ve heard of Ken Foreman. But, if you’re like I was, you may know little more than his name. I first heard his name as a high school senior when I threw a new personal best of 48.94m at Seattle Pacific University’s Ken Foreman Invitational. Although I later found out the throw was mismeasured, it was a highlight of my young career since it placed me third against a collegiate field and qualified me for the USATF Junior National Championships. Even though this memory was planted deep in my mind, I never learned anything about the man other than the picture I saw of him in the meet program. But from that picture you could see Foreman was a coach’s coach.
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Book Review: Bondarchuk’s Transfer of Training in Sports Volume 2

This article from the HHMR Media archives is being provided as a free preview. For access to other archived articles from Bingisser’s Blog and additional premium content from other authors, become a member now.

Last month I reviewed the first volume of Anatoly Bondarchuk’s Transfer of Training. In volume one, my coach essentially puts to rest the notion that stronger is better. By laying out the correlations between training exercises and results, it becomes clear that strength gains only equal further throws for beginning hammer throwers. The book shows all of the data Bondarchuk has collected for all track and field events and provides a useful guide to what exercises transfer over to competitive results. Volume two, which was just released by Ultimate Athlete Concepts and available for purchase in the HMMR Media store, continues where volume one left off.
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Book Review: Bondarchuk’s Transfer of Training in Sports

This article from the HHMR Media archives is being provided as a free preview. For access to other archived articles from Bingisser’s Blog and additional premium content from other authors, become a member now.

“We will free ourselves from naive and abstract types of conclusions: as for example, to throw the hammer such and such distance it is necessary to do the barbell squat a certain number of time, the power clean a certain number of times and so on. The time of primitiveness has already passed and the time has come to look at the problem all the more seriously.”

-Anatoliy Bondarchuk in “Transfer of Training in Sports,” available from the HMMR Media Store

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