Posts

Bodyweight exercises: precision, variety, and progression

In modern coaching, all kinds of modes of exercises are paraded around, often to the exclusion of others. Bodyweight exercise is one mode of training that is making a comeback, even before the onset of the recent pandemic. Read more

Staying fit in a pandemic: Vol. 15

In 1985 I left college and became a teacher and a coach. My decision to do that was based a combination of factors. The biggest was I loved to learn, I loved athletics and I wanted to share those passions with young people who I enjoyed being around. However, there was one part of my decision at that time that was made on a very poor assumption. Read more

Announcement about GAIN 2020 conference

The highlight of my year is connecting with the athletic development community at the annual GAIN Conference. In light of our current public health situation, we have decided to reformat GAIN 2020. We are planning to transform this year’s gathering into a digital format to be presented in July. Read more

Social coaching while social distancing

In times such as this, many things can come to mind that will comfort us in the unknown. Ecclesiastes 3:1 says, “For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven.” Regardless of your beliefs or opinions, this text goes on to explain the ebbs and flows of life and how little control we have over the events in our lives. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 219: Pandemic training roundtable

We are entering uncharted territory for coaches. The current pandemic as turned our life, our cities, our culture, and our teams into chaos. Sport will always play a back seat to the greater society, but coaches can still be more important than ever in these difficult times. For athletes, some sort of activity can help keep their minds off all the stress around them. On this week’s podcast we invite some coaches from our team of contributors to share how they are managing their team and specific training methods they are turning to. Read more

Staying fit in a pandemic: Vol. 10

As I did last Sunday, I am posting some inspiration instead of a workout. I originally posted this John Gardner piece in 2013. These words always challenge me. Because life is often about renewal I occasionally repost this in the spring time. With the first day of spring 2020 last Thursday and folks around the country house bound, I am finding this essay to resonate more than ever. Read more

Staying fit in a pandemic: Vol. 8

Long time readers of this blog know that I used to have a series called Five Reads for Friday which consisted of my recommended reads from the past week — mostly sports related. Today I am pausing from my own suggestions of workouts to share some people I have been following this past week who are sharing great stuff that could help you. It started as five but has steadily grown as I thought about it and the week went on. Read more

Staying fit in a pandemic: Vol. 3

As it is Sunday, I will take a break from posting workout information. Don’t worry; more to come tomorrow! Instead today, I would like to share some inspiration from the great coach Al Carius that I think is applicable to our current plight. He has been men’s Cross Country and Track and Field Coach at North Central College in Naperville, Illinois for 52 years and has an incredible record of success. Read more

February 2020 in review: skill acquisition

Throughout February we took a look at skill acquisition, motor learning, and teaching technique. Below you’ll find all of our new content on the topic, including highlights from our archive that give some more insight on the area. Read more

Think external, not internal

George M. Perry is a running and sports performance coach with emphases on movement training and post-injury return-to-play. Edited with minor contributions from Martin Bingisser.

Most coaches’ instruction approaches drills biomechanically: body positions, joint angles, activation patterns underlying movement sequences. These referents require an internal focus of attention. Athletes are directed and trained to think about how they are moving their body. What if we have been going about it all wrong? What if athletes instead focus on the intended effect on an implement, the environment, or something else external to the athlete’s body? Read more