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Sports Science Monthly – December 2018

Lots of new topics in the December edition of Sports Science Monthly. Our first study looks at the role of genetics in endurance programming. We also look at research on whether athletes eat enough, monitoring acute:chronic training loads, biomarkers, acceleration performance, and some interesting new research on tactical periodization. Read more

GAINcast Episode 147: Warming up

The first part of training is often the most misunderstood. Warming up isn’t just about getting the body warm, it is about preparing the body and mind for the training session ahead. On this week’s GAINcast Vern walks us through some of his warm ups and discusses the key elements to focus on. Read more

Sleep, stress, and physical performance

Whilst athletes and coaches have long focused on the physical aspects of performance enhancement, such as training program design and exercise selection, it is only relatively recently that we have started to pay attention to how stress and sleep might also influence both the magnitude of adaptations seen following a training program, and competition performance. Based on this recent research, we have an increased understanding of the need to account for psychological stress, including, in the case of younger athletes, academic work load, when developing optimal training programs. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 184: Impacting basketball (with Joe Abunassar)

Basketball players have a reputation for being some of the most athletic individuals across all sports. Tall, big, fast, and agile, they seem to have it all. Joe Abunassar started off as a basketball coach before broadening his skillset to include strength and conditioning, skills training, and more. Now his team at Impact Basketball helps prepare athletes for all aspects of the game. On this week’s episode he joins us to discuss the physical needs of basketball, preparing athletes for them, and how skills training and physically training are linked. Read more

Warm up to play, don’t play to warm up

When I started coaching at the University of Wisconsin, our men’s soccer team always started the season in August by playing an exhibition against a visiting club from Germany. Despite the mid-summer heat, the German goal-keepers would be out on the field a good hour before the game, building progressively towards game-like movements at game pace. Read more

GAINcast Episode 146: Microdosing training

Microdosing has become a buzz word over the last year in training circles, but it isn’t a new concept. Small but frequent units of training can add up to provide significant value to athletic development. On this episode of the GAINcast we discuss the concept of microdosing, how it looks like in practice, and how to progress microdosing over the season. Read more

A good warm up never get old

It’s cliche to say that the warm up is the most overlooked part of training, but despite hearing more and more share creative ideas for warming up over the past few years, I still see more bad warmups than good warmups. Running a few laps and stretching is still more the rule than the exception. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 183: Value of staying put (with Zack Nielsen)

Take a look at a typical NCAA weight room and you’ll see first hand the coaching carousal. The phenomenon isn’t unique to universities; you often see young coaches across the world changing job every few years in an attempt to fast track career development. Zack Nielsen might be young, but he’s learned the value of a different path: the value of staying put. As head strength coach for Olympic sports at Eastern Washington University, he joins to the podcast to talk about the value of staying put in career (and life) development. Read more

November 2018 in review: book club

Some people say a picture is worth a thousand words, but for some concepts a good book can be worth a thousand pictures. There’s no doubt then why so many world-class coaches are avid readers not only about sports, but about all kinds of topics. As a great doctor once said: “The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.” That doctor was Dr. Seuss, which goes to show you can learn from all types of books. Read more