Posts

The lost art of bounding and speed bounding

Plyometric training is a popular modality used to develop power for a range of power-dominant sports or skills requiring power, such as sprinting and jumping. Although plyometric methods can be applied to a wide range of sports, I believe they are especially relevant to skills requiring reactive strength. I discussed the importance of reactive strength to jumping performance in my last article on training vertical jump performance. The purpose of this article is to discuss the application of two specific plyometric exercises which are often overlooked: bounding and speed-bounding. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 191: Sports specific bulls**t (with Michael Boyle)

Mike Boyle sparked an online debate when he called out sports specific training last month. In his opinion, no matter the sport, 90% of training doesn’t change. As an elite coach who has worked with dozens of professional sports, he has seen first hand what needs to be tailored to the sport, and what applies to all sports. On this week’s episode he joins us to talk shop about his approach to sport specific training and where it often goes wrong. Read more

Building a foundation for athletic development

We all have to learn to crawl before we walk, walk before we run, and run before we sprint. Too many times I have seen coaches just throw their athletes into heavy squats, heavy bench, heavy cleans without the athletes being able to handle their own body weight. Movements like pull ups, push ups, bench dips, body weight squats etc. are skipped or neglected to get to the heavy stuff. Read more

Proprioceptive plyometrics

Plyometric training is not a particularly new training method. Even though it has recently received much attention it has been a part of the training of athletes in a variety of sports for years. It just was not called plyometrics. The word plyometrics didn’t appear in the training literature until the late 1960s and since then scientific research has given us a fundamental understanding of the elastic properties of muscle and its trainability. Read more

GAINcast Episode 153: Making shapes (with Tom Barton)

Range of motion is a critical element of movement. If you can’t get into a position, it will be difficult or impossible to incorporate that into a movement. Tom Barton has worked as a physiotherapist with some of the world’s top swimmers. He joins this week’s GAINcast to look at how the brain and body interact to reach positions, training range of motion, and other related topics. Read more

Understanding and training vertical jumping performance

Jumping is a critical skill in many sports. But when we talk about jumping performance, we need to be clear about the jumping skills we are wanting to improve. Different sports require different types of jumping. By understanding the vertical jump in more detail, we can gain more insight into training the physical needs required to jump higher. Read more

Are there non-responders to caffeine?

Caffeine is one of the most performance enhancing drugs available to athletes, with research demonstrating that it has ergogenic effects on a range of exercise types, including aerobic endurance, strength, and repeated anaerobic activities. Athletes are of course aware of this, and research tends to suggest that around three-quarters of athletes utilise caffeine either immediately before or during competitions. But new research indicates that the effects are not as general as you may think, and could have no effect or even harm performances for some athletes. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 190: Women in coaching (with Rhonda Riley)

Over the last half century, Title IX and other initiatives have proven very effective in increase participation of women in sport. But despite the growth in participation, the number of women in the coaching ranks lag behind and is even regressing in many sports. On this episode of the podcast we look at women in coaching with Duke head cross country coach Rhonda Riley. We dive into some of reasons why women are not well represented in coaching, as well as ways to fix the problem. In addition, we look at the profession of coaching as a whole and some of the issues it is facing in other areas. Read more

January 2019 in review: goals

To help start the year off on a right foot, we focused on goals in January. From setting goals to achieving goals, we gathered different perspectives of the topic from our team of coaches throughout the month. All of our new resources are linked below, as well as some additional articles from our archives. Read more

Book Club: Simon Sinek’s Start With Why

Everyone is looking for the secret formula for success. The funny thing is, it might just be one word: why. In Simon Sinek’s book Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action, he explains the power of simply asking why. The word goes a long ways. The best companies understand the why. The most successful athletes understand the why. Good coaching starts with why, as Vern Gambetta talked about on this week’s GAINcast. This month’s site theme is setting goals, and good goals start with why. Sinek summarizes the topic well early in the book: Read more