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November 2020 in review: technology and sport

The site theme in November was technology and sport. Throughout the month we put together 5 new articles and 3 new podcasts from 7 contributors about how to effectively integrate technology into training. You’ll find all the links below, as well as highlights from our archive on the topic.
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GAINcast Episode 203: Speed reserve (with Gareth Sandford)

Middle-distance running requires a unique interplay of aerobic and anaerobic energetics. Historically, however, research on the events has centered on the aerobic side. Physiologist Gareth Sandford has sought to correct that imbalance by looking in detail at anaerobic speed reserve. He joins this week’s GAINcast to discuss his work and look at how to profile athletes and develop individualized training for complex events. Read more

Using technology to integrate testing, training, and teaching

As technology has become commonplace in training, more and more coaches understand how to use technology. But getting the most out of any technology requires more than that. It requires seamless integration with training. Dean Benton is a master of integrating technology in the training process. As our site theme this month is technology and sport, it is only appropriate to get the master’s take on how to combine the two. Read more

Jack Skille Show Season 2, Episode 1: Transition game

To kick off season 2, we sit down to share our tips, stories, and lessons learned about transitions and post-career identity. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 236: Rethinking VBT (with Wil Fleming)

Velocity-based training has been gaining traction over the last few years as the technology becomes more affordable. Many of the resources out there, however, keep discussing the same old approaches to VBT. Weightlifting coach Wil Fleming just published a new book on VBT based on his experience using it in a sport that is based around the barbell. On this week’s podcast we discuss some of the methods he has tried out and how they can be adapted to other sports. Read more

Navigating the technology paradox in sport

Technology is a good thing, right? When we evaluate technology we tend to focus on the benefits: what it can add. But the paradox of technology is that it often has hidden costs we do not see up front. Determining whether technology is good or not can be harder than it looks. Read more

Penetrating the data smog through better visualization

As anyone who witnessed the UK government’s recent presentation on COVID-19 data will know, data is only useful if it can be read and understood clearly. For those who missed the broadcast, the presentation consisted of many slides of data with the BBC banner on the screen blocking out the titles! The audience of millions was left looking at lines and bar charts that had no context or explanation. Unfortunately such examples can easily be found in the world of sport too. Read more

More data isn’t always the answer

This month’s theme on HMMRMedia is technology and sport. Over the past few years technology has often become synonymous with data. New technologies are allowing more data to be collected in sport. This information can then be utilized by coaches and support staff to understand where the athlete is at, and to make decisions on a future course of action. Read more

GAINcast Episode 202: Technology in sport

Technology has changed the world and sport over the last few decades. It has helped sport make substantial progress in some areas, but also failed to live up to the hype in others. On this week’s episode we talk about how technology can best support coaching, and share examples of how to evaluate technology, best practices in using it, and more. Read more

Digital twins and the future of data modeling in sport

On April 11, 1970, the crew of Apollo 13 blasted off from Kennedy Space Centre at the start of their mission to the moon. Following the recent successes of Apollo missions 11 and 12, James Lovell and Fred Haise were due to become the fifth and sixth humans to walk on the moon. However, just under 56 hours after taking off, and 330,000 km from Earth, disaster struck. Read more