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HMMR Podcast Episode 219: Pandemic training roundtable

We are entering uncharted territory for coaches. The current pandemic as turned our life, our cities, our culture, and our teams into chaos. Sport will always play a back seat to the greater society, but coaches can still be more important than ever in these difficult times. For athletes, some sort of activity can help keep their minds off all the stress around them. On this week’s podcast we invite some coaches from our team of contributors to share how they are managing their team and specific training methods they are turning to. Read more

Staying fit in a pandemic: Vol. 1

I am hoping to share a daily post on stuff anyone can do anywhere while the pandemic changes our daily life. Before I get into Post #1, let me emphasize that in no way am I trying to trivialize what is happening to any of us. Clearly, athletics should take a back seat to this historic and tragic world health event. That being said, maybe these posts will be a little way to make life better for someone out there who can stay fit. Read more

November 2019 in review: foundational strength

We took a step back to the basics this month by looking at building foundational strength. Foundational strength is that strength quality that establishes the trainability for all the other strength qualities. Throughout the month we put together 1 new video, 3 new podcasts, and 4 articles from 10 contributors. Read more

Taking leg circuits to the next level

Every year I become more and more convinced of the effectiveness of the Gambetta Leg Circuits. A simple combination of four exercises ticks so many boxes for me in training: it is efficient, improves coordination, and develops strength all at the same time. For those familiar or unfamiliar with leg circuits, I hope this article explain a bit about how they work and some new variations that can make them an even better tool for training. Read more

The ingredients for a solid foundation

No matter the sport, no matter the athlete, everyone needs to begin with a foundation. Read more

Assessing foundational strength

Foundational strength is the essence of trainability. We need an appropriate level of coordination and strength through a maximum range of motion to set us up for athletic endeavors. Without it training becomes a game of Buckaroo – loading up and getting work done but waiting to get kicked in the mouth. Read more

Long and strong: why athletes need both

As young people go through their growth spurts their bones become longer. In the short term this can be detrimental to skill and strength as they become accustomed to their longer levers. They have become long, but not strong. Imagine rolling modeling clay out on a table. You start off with a solid ball and watch as it gradually gets longer and thinner. You pick it up and it flops around, useful for shaping, but more likely to fall apart. Read more

GAINcast Episode 174: Foundational strength roundtable

Building the athlete from the ground up requires a strong foundation. But what materials go into that foundation? When is it built? How do we maintain it? On this week’s GAIN cast we bring together a roundtable with guests James Marshall and Steve Myrland to discuss the topic from all angles. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 191: Sports specific bulls**t (with Michael Boyle)

Mike Boyle sparked an online debate when he called out sports specific training last month. In his opinion, no matter the sport, 90% of training doesn’t change. As an elite coach who has worked with dozens of professional sports, he has seen first hand what needs to be tailored to the sport, and what applies to all sports. On this week’s episode he joins us to talk shop about his approach to sport specific training and where it often goes wrong. Read more

Building a foundation for athletic development

We all have to learn to crawl before we walk, walk before we run, and run before we sprint. Too many times I have seen coaches just throw their athletes into heavy squats, heavy bench, heavy cleans without the athletes being able to handle their own body weight. Movements like pull ups, push ups, bench dips, body weight squats etc. are skipped or neglected to get to the heavy stuff. Read more