All periodization is undulating

Why does periodization – or as I prefer to call it Planned Performance Training (PPT) – have to be either linear or undulating? Frankly in my application of the principles of planned performance training for 49 years I have observed that adaptation is always undulating. The body does nothing in a linear manner, so therefore all periodization is undulating. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 146: Leg day

Strong legs are a critical factor in nearly every sport. And as the legs are involved in so many types of movements, there are many ways to train them too, both traditional and non-traditional. Some debates online recently have been critical of different training methods, so we thought it would be good to lay out our approach. On this episode we talk about how and why we use various training methods for legs, and how we progress and combine the methods. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – March 2018

In the March edition of Sports Science Monthly we look at new research across a variety of areas including the impact of coaching behavior, Selye’s General Adaptation Syndrome, nordic hamstring exercises, genetic testing, monitoring fatigue and more. Read more

GAINcast Episode 108: Counterculture (with Steve Myrland)

Sometimes changing culture is about taking baby steps; other times it is about creating a counterculture. Throughout his career in elite sport Steve Myrand started to realize his approach just didn’t match with the traditional strength and conditioning culture. So now he is walking the halls of his local high school trying to start his own culture from the ground up. That means getting head coaches on board, redefining how his success is measured, reprioritizing physical education, and addressing the unique physical and cultural problems inherent in coaching teenagers. On this week’s GAINcast we dive into those topics, as well as some thoughts on training youth athletes. Read more

How John Pryor adapts training to culture

Over the past few years, perhaps no coach has influence my coaching more than John Pryor. Currently the head of strength and conditioning for Fiji rugby in the lead-up to next year’s World Cup, Pryor has decades of experience in the sport working for Japan, Australia, and top clubs in both countries. He has a unique ability to blend the art of coaching and sports science, and also objectively critique his own performance. Read more

Dark holes

Throughout my career I have observed athletes disappear into dark holes never to reappear or if they did they were a shadow of their former selves. What is an athletic dark hole? It is biased one sided training that emphasizes development of one physical quality to the exclusion of all others. Read more

Strength training

Strength training is coordination training with appropriate resistance to handle your bodyweight, project an implement, move or resist movement of another body, resist gravity and optimize ground reaction forces. Let’s look at the elements of the definition in detail: Read more

The positives and negatives of exercise

We all know that exercise is good for us. The lists of benefits that exercise can give us is as wide as it is varied; it lowers our risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. It provides a mental health benefit. It reduces our chances of having low bone mineral density. It’s an important part of the healthy aging process, with exercise allowing for a maintenance of muscle strength as we grow older, making us less likely to suffer from falls, and keeping us mobile and active for much longer. Read more

Functional training

Functional training is a label for a concept. As with any label it is subject to various interpretations. I originally conceived it as multi lateral training integrating various training modalities (medicine ball, stretch cord, weight training, dumbbells, body weight etc.) to produce significant adaptation in specific performance parameters. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 144: Inside the Games (with US Ski & Snowboard)

When you watch the Olympics it is easy to see all see the athlete performances on television. But what we don’t see is the logistical work required to help get the most out of the athletes on the biggest day of their careers. Support teams start planning years in advance to make sure that athletes have optimal lodging, food, and training facilities in their final hours before competition. On this week’s episode we are joined by strength coach Tracy Fober and high performance chef Megan Chacosky from US Ski & Snowboqard to talk about the steps required to bring their high performance support system to PyeongChang, and how to get non-traditional sports to buy into the high performance culture. Read more