Posts

Free the kids – let them play

I do not know Nick Willis, but he is a current athlete that I hold in high regard both for his accomplishments on the track, longevity and willingness to share his thoughts/lessons learned throughout his career. He posted this on Twitter yesterday, needless to say it really resonated with me: Read more

Moving beyond dynamic correspondence

Start talking about special strength or specific strength and one of the first things that often comes up is Yuri Verkhoshansky and the principle of dynamic correspondence. In our latest video lesson, I sat down with German national discus coach René Sack to discuss his framework for specific strength and how he applies it to discus throwers. What stood out to me the most is how big of a gap there is between the theory of special strength and how it is put into practice by top coaches. Dynamic correspondence might look good on paper, but top coaches like René are finding different ways to make specific strength effective in training. Read more

Training speed appropriately

Plow horse, quarter horse or a thoroughbred race horse, you can’t train them all the same. They all have different inherent qualities that must be taken in consideration. Read more

Balancing power and skill in the throwing events

On last week’s HMMR Podcast, guest Kevin McMahon talked about how lifting and throwing chase different feelings. A maximum squat has a very different feeling that a personal best throw. A good throw is like a sprint: it is loose and quick, not a grind like heavy lifting. Maximum strength plays an important role in develop throwers, but McMahon emphasized that it should not take priority over the feel for the throwing movement. Read more

GAINcast Episode 156: Chucking spears (with Steve Backley)

Watch the javelin in full speed and it is a thing of beauty. Watch it in slow motion and it’ll often make you cringe. In order to throw a spear the length of a football field requires athletes to put their body in extreme positions with massive amounts of force transferring through the kinetic chain. Mastering it is hard, staying at the top even harder. Steve Backley was not just one of the best javelin throwers of all time, but sat atop the sport for 15 years. On this episode of the GAINcast, Backley joins us to discuss how he developed in the sport, what creates the perfect throw, and becoming a better competitor. Read more

Vern Gambetta

Today’s reality in coaching

As coaches today we face many different challenges than I did when I started coaching in 1969. Data is growing faster than ever before with 2.5 exabytes being produced each day! That is the equivalent of 250,000 Libraries of Congress of new information created each day. Read more

February 2019 in review: plyometrics

In the end, nearly all of sport comes down to speed. Plyometric training is an essential tool to train speed. By focusing on the stretch-shortening of muscle action, plyometric training looks at how to improve speed in a different way than simple weight lifting. This month on HMMR Media we focused on plyometric training, putting together 2 new videos, 1 new podcast, and 4 great articles looking at the topic from different perspectives from plyometric progressions to better variations and plyometrics in rehabilitation. Read more

Current reading

These are two books that have just finished. Read more

The role of plyometrics in injury rehabilitation

This article was co-authored with my colleague Peter Colagiuri at BioAthletic. Colagiuri is release an upcoming app for sports injury diagnosis. You can learn more at Sports Injury Online.

When we talk about plyometrics, we are talking about a very broad category of movements. The one thing they have in common is that they involve rapid stretching and shortening of contractile and elastic components of muscle. When it comes to rehabilitation, this category is unfortunately often brushed over or completely forgotten. In this article we hope to show some ideas on how and why plyometrics should be included in the rehabilitation spectrum. Read more

Training must be sport specific!

Sport specific training is not a myth, it is a must. Each sport has unique demands that must be addressed in training. Lest we forget training is not just preparing the athlete for the demands of competition but also for the demands of the actual practice of the sport, practice demands will often exceed game demands through the shear repetition of movements and skills. Read more