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HMMR Podcast Episode 90: Method Man (with Bryan Mann)

Professor and practitioner Bryan Mann from the University of Missouri joins our episode for the third time to discuss turning ideas into methods. Many more coaches have now started to use velocity tracking devices, but how do you create a method out of it? Mann shares his thoughts, and also discusses the latest research on velocity-based training, new technology, his new book, and different methods to easily individualize training such as APRE. Read more

The Role of Specific Strength Exercises in Team Sports

A question that comes up nearly every time I present on specific strength exercises is whether such work in the weight room is really necessary for team sports. Athletes from these sports spend large quantities of time on the field and little time training off of it. As a result many strength coaches feel a need to balance out their training and focus only on general exercises once the athletes enter the weight room. I must admit, it is a great question. In fact, I’ve been pondering it for a few months now. Read more

Unforgiving, Relentless and Undefeated

I am not talking about the UConn women’s basketball that just won their 100th straight game or the New England Patriots. I am talking about two of the greatest athletes ever! Who are they? You know them because you compete with them all day everyday. One is invisible but beats you every time. The other is always underfoot, but because it is so familiar we fail to recognize it. I am talking about gravity and the ground. Read more

Sports Science?

I see more gobbledygook and sciency stuff called “sports science” going on today that ever in my years as athlete and coach. Has anyone taken a step back and honestly assessed where we are going with all this? Everybody and anybody who administers a wellness survey or monitors some physiological function now calls themselves a sports scientist. Over the course of my career I have had the opportunity to work with some the greatest exercise physiologists, biomechanists, sports psychologists and motor learning/skill acquisition experts ever. I have seen how these professionals work as part of a performance team, backstage, not onstage claiming super bowl wins, world cup wins or Olympic goal medals. We were all part of a performance team with a clear goal working in one direction to make the athlete or team better. The great performance teams that I have worked in and seen work are coach driven. This demands that the sport coach be educated to ask the right questions and know how to direct the efforts. Read more

Keep It Messy

Back in 2008, I injured my hamstring really badly. Most hamstring injuries are within the biceps femoris, which is the outer of the three muslces, and tend to occur around the musculotendinous junction; mine was much different – I injured my semi-tendinosis at the insertion. This is quite a complex injury, because the insertion of the semi-tendinosis is also very close to the insertion of a number of different structures, including sartorius and gracilus, in a structure known as the pes anserinus, as well as a bursa. It was an incredibly painful injury, and I was unable to run for nine weeks, which meant I missed all of my sprint training in February and March, as well as a bit of April. I was managing the injury fairly aggressively and progressing nicely, and opened up my competitive season at the start of June in Turin. Here, I was involved in a very tight finish, which caused me to re-injure my hamstring. Obviously, this was bad news; 2008 was Olympic year, and I had 4 weeks until the National Trials where I had to qualify for the team. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 88: Jumping

Jumping is an integral part of athletic development and training for all power sports. But we have a little different approach to it than most coaches. On this episode we discuss using mutli-jumps as a tool for athletic development, including a detailed look at Nick Garcia’s jumping progression, periodization, and more. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – January 2017

Welcome back to another monthly round up of recent research in the sports science world. This month we finally have some objective evidence on the use of high fat, low carbohydrate diets for elite athletes – perhaps this will lessen the debate, although I expect not. We also have a look at the training of elite endurance athletes, early versus late specialization in Olympic Athletes, sleep (as always), oxidative stress, and the use of hot baths after exercise, amongst others. Enjoy. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 87: The Mentor (with Kelvin Giles)

After decades coaching elite track and field and rugby, Kelvin Giles has turned his attention more recently to youth development. Kids are no longer learning how to move, and we need to address it from the ground in both our approach to training and coaches education. On this episode Giles joins us to discuss foundational movements, coaches education, the pillars of performance, advice to beginning coaches, and how national governing bodies can support performance. Read more

Training Talk With Frans Bosch (Part 2)

Earlier this week we posted the first part in an interview with Frans Bosch. In it, we discussed chasing perfection, and the role of variation and attractors in motor learning. You can read the interview here. But that was just the tip of the iceberg. We continued the conversation to talk about some topics that are central to what I often write about: transfer, specificity, and transfer. In addition we ask him where his focus is heading forward. Read more

GAINcast Episode 49: Reconditioning (with Bill Knowles)

Bill Knowles is a world-renowned expert in reconditioning, having worked with athletes and teams from across the globe at the Olympic and professional levels. He joins us on this weeks podcast to discuss injuries, coming back from injury, and athletic development. Read more