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Jack Skille Show Episode 5: Jack Johnson on finding your path

On episode 5 of the Jack Skille Show, we are joined by Pittsburgh Penguins defenseman Jack Johnson. He shares his own developmental path, what led him down it, and what lessons he learned at each step including play as 5-year-old in Michigan, attending Shattuck-St. Mary’s, joining the National Team Development Program, University of Michigan, and finally the NHL.
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What coaches can learn from Frans Bosch’s Anatomy of Agility

Frans Bosch’s upcoming book Anatomy of Agility: Movement Analysis in Sport is the most comprehensive text I have seen on human movement and the underlying biological systems that regulate it. It expands on Bosch’s previous book Strength Training and Coordination: An Integrative Approach and goes into a huge amount of detail to explain how complex dynamical systems theory applies to the regulation of change of direction in field sports. Below I hope to explain the key takeaways in the book, where I struggled, and how it will impact my own approach as a strength and conditioning coach. Read more

Frans Bosch on intrinsic learning and understanding attractors

Yesterday we posted the first part of an interview with Frans Bosch in anticipation of his new book coming out next week: Anatomy of Agility: Movement Analysis in Sport (available for preorder in the HMMR Store). In that part we looked at role of perception in agility, how to eliminate errors, developing independent athletes, and quantifying progress. Below we continue to the conversation by taking a look at a few different topics: attractors of agility, connecting training to context, and how this impacts other general training concepts. Read more

Frans Bosch on agility, perception, and understanding errors

Agree with his methods or not, few coaches have forced us to rethink how we prepare athletes as Frans Bosch has over the last five years. The publication of Strength Training and Coordination: An Integrative Approach started a conversation about how motor learning concepts can be brought into the weight room. Read more

The training log

The training log is perhaps the most underused and underrated tool in making the athlete better. I have kept a training log since my junior year in high school – 57 years. Why, because we had a pro football player from the Dallas Cowboys come and speak to us and one of the things, he emphasized was writing down your workout. It made sense, so I started. Read more

Jack Skill Show Episode 4: Trust the process

On episode four of the Jack Skille Show, we are take time to highlight and underscore some of the lessons learned from our first episode, and share some stories from our own experiences around the theme of trust: trusting the process, trusting coaches, finding your own path, and how coaches can gain the trust of players. Read more

Three dimensional agility

Agility training is often perceived to be conducted in two dimensions. Whether programmed, random, game or task orientated, it usually consists of change of directions on a left –right and forward –backward continuum. Yet movement rarely takes place in just two dimensions: subtle and not so subtle changes of height and depth also take place. A boxer bobbing and weaving or a gymnast doing a double front somersault both have to move their centre of gravity up and down as well as sideways and forwards respectively. Read more

Consequences

For every exercise, drill, and training session there are intended consequences and unintended consequences. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – May 2020

Every month we take a deep dive into the latest research in sports science. Players are key partners in building a team culture, and their contributions depend a lot on their informal roles. The first article we look at in this month’s edition breaks down key traits of cultural architects, which can assist coaches in developing their own team culture. Then we look at  ecological dynamics, acute:chronic workload ratio, training time, and more. Read more

Preparing the body to change direction

The purpose of this article is to give any readers an insight into how I think about and prepare people for change of direction tasks. These change of direction tasks are simply that, not agility tasks. We want athletes to be able to change direction powerfully, quickly and efficiently in competition. In preparation, I like to look at these qualities in reverse: efficiency, speed and power. Change of direction all starts with promoting efficiency by understanding the attractors of the movement. Read more