Posts

Periodization in uncertain times

A planned program of preparation is the foundation that elite performance is built upon. Under normal circumstances, a coach creates a strategic plan based on a variety of factors, the athlete then executes the plan, and results follow. Read more

Making shapes

Shapes was brought to the forefront of my thinking about 10 years ago when I was working with one of my swim teams. The coach kept talking about getting smaller into the wall and taller off-the-wall off the wall into a streamline. I left the workout thinking what he was really telling the swimmers was to make different shapes. This got me thinking about the whole concept of shapes and what we needed to do to impact the athlete’s abilities to make the required shapes. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – October 2020

Every month we take a deep dive into the latest research in sports science. In the October edition we start off looking at disordered eating in sport, including a look at prevalence, warning signs, and more. We then look at how training can be viewed in terms of creating synergies, monitoring training load in endurance athletes, integrated sports rehabilitation, game day priming, and more. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 233: NCAA roundtable

Over the last eight months we’ve heard from high school coaches, professional coaches, and others about how they’ve adapted their training to pandemic. One voice we haven’t heard from is NCAA coaches. The NCAA system puts some unique restrictions on coaches and athletes, and on this episode we invite on several NCAA coaches to discuss how they’re planning in uncertainty and dealing with other uncertainties like program cuts. Read more

4 lessons learned on planning and periodization

On the first day of my masters program in sports coaching we were told to study supercompensation theory for homework. All the students dove into Tudor Bompa’s treatise Periodization: Theory and Methodology of Training. The book made the whole concept seem so easy, including nice graphics on how supercompensation worked. I thought I had hit pay-dirt with the organization and structure laid out in the book, and got Bompa himself to sign my copy a few years later. Read more

Systematic sport development

Sport systems have always fascinated me, even before I started coaching. When I was in college, we played the great San Diego State Football teams coached by Don Coryell. It was obvious they had a system and played to that system and recruited players for that system. My junior year in college we had a clinic at Fresno State and the defensive line coach at San Diego State, John Madden, was the featured speaker. He gave insights into the system, how he selected players for the positions and what he did to develop them. Needless to say, that confirmed what I had seen on film and on the field, it left a deep impression on me of the need to have a system if you wanted to have sustained excellence. Read more

Applying dynamic systems theory to rehabilitation

Our understanding of movement is by no means complete. We may never have a complete grasp of the complexity at play when we watch athletes move and perform in sport. If we acknowledge that then we must respect the inherent wisdom of the body to solve problems and adapt to situations in the most efficient manner. The role then of training becomes that of providing problems for the body to solve in the direction we want performance to go – faster, higher, harder. Read more

Accidental fitness

“Accidental fitness” is a great concept articulated in a recent GAIN Master Class coffee break by University of Portland assistant cross country and track coach Jack Mullaney. Essentially accidental fitness is that small edge of fitness you get from general life activities, like walking to class, perhaps working in the yard or just moving meaningfully. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 232: Back pain roundtable

At some point in their life, nearly everyone will experience back pain. For such a widespread issue, you would think that treatment options would be pretty clear cut. But traditional approaches like improving strength, mobility, or endurance don’t show much relation to back pain. Dr. Eyal Lederman has been one of the leaders in criticizing the traditional treatment model. Lederman and athletic trainer Joe Przytula join this week’s episode for a roundtable discussion on back pain. Read more

Brave Enough by Jessie Diggins

I have always been an an avid reader of coaches and athletes’ biographies. Each biography gave me insights into what that athlete tick. How they approached training. How they got into their sport. How they were coached. There is so much to learn  from the experiences of others on the journey to achieve the pinnacle of sport performance. Read more