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January 2019 in review: goals

To help start the year off on a right foot, we focused on goals in January. From setting goals to achieving goals, we gathered different perspectives of the topic from our team of coaches throughout the month. All of our new resources are linked below, as well as some additional articles from our archives. Read more

Book Club: Simon Sinek’s Start With Why

Everyone is looking for the secret formula for success. The funny thing is, it might just be one word: why. In Simon Sinek’s book Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action, he explains the power of simply asking why. The word goes a long ways. The best companies understand the why. The most successful athletes understand the why. Good coaching starts with why, as Vern Gambetta talked about on this week’s GAINcast. This month’s site theme is setting goals, and good goals start with why. Sinek summarizes the topic well early in the book: Read more

Lessons on achieving impossible goals from The Dawn Wall

Living in Switzerland means it is hard to avoid the mountains. The more I explore them, the more I am amazed by climbers. Some adventure sports are simply about who has the most courage. Climbing is about who is the most focused on their goals. I have never climbed a mountain or even gone bouldering, but as a spectator of the sport I am captivated by just how focused the best climbers are. While more often than not they fail, every time they succeed my jaw drops a little more. Read more

Where corporate goal setting went wrong

When it comes to goal-setting in the sporting world, everything is starting to look a bit more corporate. Talk of goals, aspirations, and dreams has been supplanted by detailed discussions on key performance indicators (KPIs), targets, and measurables. The field of play and the boardroom are starting to merge. Read more

GAINcast 151: Bigger and better goals

The start of the year means new goals and resolutions for athletes and coaches. Unfortunately, many goals are set at the start of the year and quickly forgotten thereafter. On this episode of the GAINcast we talk about not just how to set better goals, but some best practices on how to make the goals reality and achieve them. Read more

What Mount Everest can teach us about goals

Standing at 8,848m (29,029 feet), Mount Everest is the world’s tallest mountain, making it a target for daredevils and adventurers to attempt to summit. Despite not being an especially challenging technical climb – you can essentially “just” walk up large sections of it – summiting Everest is dangerous for many reasons, including high winds, fatiguing conditions, and the high altitude, which can induce altitude sickness leading to pulmonary and cerebral edema. Historically, it has been estimated that one person dies for every 4 who summit. As a result, around 300 people have died on the mountain, and, given the logistical issues associated with recovering a body under such dangerous conditions, many of these people remain on Everest. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 188: The state of sport (with Vern Gambetta)

Our annual tradition is to start off the year with a combined episode of the HMMR Podcast and GAINcast to discuss the state of training for sports. The whole crew gets together on this episode to talk about some of the issue facing our profession, the recent topics we’ve been studying, and our goals for 2019. Read more

GAINcast Episode 150: The state of sport (with Nick Garcia)

Our annual tradition is to start off the year with a combined episode of the HMMR Podcast and GAINcast to discuss the state of training for sports. The whole crew gets together on this episode to talk about some of the issue facing our profession, the recent topics we’ve been studying, and our goals for 2019. Read more

Simple and effective goals

My goal this past year and for this year is really quite simple: everything I am doing is focused on getting better at getting better.

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The athlete’s growth process – making the champion’s choice

The athlete’s growth process is by no means linear or clearly defined. In my experience there are three steps of indeterminate length: Read more