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Sports Science Monthly – July 2018

Welcome back to another edition of Sports Science Monthly. This month, we take a closer look at monitoring post-match fatigue, the debate on hamstring muscle action, mindfulness, warming up, travel, and more. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 158: Train hard, train often (with Matt Price)

Every sport has its own training culture, and it is a difficult balancing act to try and implement your plan without alienating the status quo. After returning to hockey, strength coach Matt Price of the Los Angeles Kings has taken many small steps to fit his ideas into the sport’s existing framework. After four years, the small steps add up into a cultural shift. Price joined us on this week’s podcast to discuss his approach to training, loading, and shares examples from some of the methods he uses with the Kings. Read more

The role of sprint training for endurance athletes

Over the past few years speed development sessions have gained traction amongst endurance coaches. Successful endurance coaches of all levels—from high school to post-collegiate– are adding true speed development sessions to their year-round training regimen. I’ve had the opportunity to coach and consult with several top distance coaches, allowing me to see how speed development sessions can be incorporated into various systems and philosophies throughout the year. Read more

The importance of sprinting in injury rehabilitation

Start talking about sprinting and it won’t be long until you the discussion turns to hamstring injuries. Hamstring injuries are a major concern of any athlete that has to sprint. Soccer has a notorious hamstring problem, but they are not alone. Hamstring injuries are also the most prevalent form of non-contact injury within sports like athletics, American Football, rugby union, Australian Rules Football, cricket, and basketball. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – April 2018

In the April edition of Sports Science Monthly we look at new research across a variety of areas including the best time of day to train, dietary supplements, asymmetries in sprinting, monitoring external and internal loads, workload injury relationship, and more. Read more

The most effective solution is not always the best

Effectiveness and utility are key concepts in training. An exercise can be effective if it improves a metric of interest; for example, back squats are an effective way of improving leg strength. An exercise holds utility if its utilization is beneficial within the constraints of a training program. More often than not, effective exercises provide utility. Sometimes, however, the two aren’t the same. Read more

More than a “gene for speed”: what ACTN3 can teach us about muscle

If it’s possible to have a favorite gene, mine is ACTN3, often referred to as the speed gene. But to me it is interesting for more reasons than speed; after all top sprinters have been found to have different variants of the the gene. What is most interesting about it is that it impacts muscle function and architecture. As a result, this one gene can have a large impact on exercise adaptation, post-exercise recovery, and injury risk. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 146: Leg day

Strong legs are a critical factor in nearly every sport. And as the legs are involved in so many types of movements, there are many ways to train them too, both traditional and non-traditional. Some debates online recently have been critical of different training methods, so we thought it would be good to lay out our approach. On this episode we talk about how and why we use various training methods for legs, and how we progress and combine the methods. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – March 2018

In the March edition of Sports Science Monthly we look at new research across a variety of areas including the impact of coaching behavior, Selye’s General Adaptation Syndrome, nordic hamstring exercises, genetic testing, monitoring fatigue and more. Read more

Searching for transfer in Fiji

Earlier this month I wrote that transfer is not as straightforward as it seems, even with something as simple as linear speed. In response, some coaches, such as rugby coach John Pryor, have rethought their approach to training speed and strength. Pryor is currently the head of strength and conditioning for Fiji in the lead-up to next year’s World Cup. We’ve written several times about his approach to training speed, and he’ll cover the topic again at GAIN 2018 in June, but a few weeks ago I had a chance to talk to him about the process that got him there. Read more