Posts

GAINcast Episode 177: Training tendons (with Keith Baar)

Tendons and other connective tissue are often thought of as non-trainable, but more and more research is showing that they are more responsive to load than we thought. Professor Keith Baar is a leading researcher on the topic and joins this week’s GAINcast to talk about how connective tissue works together with muscles and bones to produce movement. We also dive into how connective tissue can be trained, as well as several other topics he has been researching. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – December 2019

Every month we take a deep dive into the latest research in sports science. This month we start off by looking at research on the performance stages of competition, then look at performance in the heat, genetic test, as well as injury topics related to sleep and hamstrings. Read more

Assessing foundational strength

Foundational strength is the essence of trainability. We need an appropriate level of coordination and strength through a maximum range of motion to set us up for athletic endeavors. Without it training becomes a game of Buckaroo – loading up and getting work done but waiting to get kicked in the mouth. Read more

Optimism in coaching: helpful or harmful?

Are you a better than average driver? In an interesting study from the early 80s, researchers asked a small group of American and Swedish study participants this very question. Their answers were illuminating; 93% of Americans believed they were better than average drivers, as did 69% of Swedes. Logically, this makes no sense; only 50% of people can be better than average drivers, and yet, these study results suggest that many people are unable to accurately understand their true driving ability relative to others. Read more

October 2019 in review: core strength

Everyone talks about the need for a strong core, but what exactly is the “core”? What function does it serve? How do we train it? And how do we progress training? This month on HMMR Media we sought some answers to those questions with 3 new member videos, 2 podcasts, and 7 new articles from 11 contributors. Read more

Rethinking hamstring function, strength, and injuries

Hamstring strain injury has remained a significant problem for field sport athletes, despite considerable attention from coaches, medical staff and researchers. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – September 2019

Every month we take a deep dive into the latest research in sports science. In the September Sports Science Monthly we look at the continuing debate on periodization and whether periodization is more effective than simply adding variation in training. We they dive into diverse topics such as injury risk, stress for university athletes, genetics, the effect of training time on strength adaptations, and more. Read more

Rethinking conditioning for contact sports

Conditioning for team sports and contact sports has evolved a lot in recent years, but when you look around there are still some big misconceptions that many coaches cling on to. There are two points that always stand out to me: that conditioning is only about energy systems and that conditioning only comes through volume. In this article I take a look at how we can rethink these areas and share what I have implemented in rugby training sessions to address both topics. Read more

GAINcast Episode 166: Team sport issues (with Nick Lumley)

There are several hot topics and challenges facing team sports at the moment such as hamstring injuries, how to best measure and use training load, and developing sport specific speed. These are hardly new questions, but they have proved tricky since the currently favored solutions don’t seem to be doing the trick. Edinburgh Rugby’s Nick Lumley spends his offseason visiting clubs around the work to get the pulse of team sports training. He just returned from his latest trip and joined this week’s GAINcast to share his perspective on these issues and where he thinks we should be looking to move forward. Read more

Does sprint training “inoculate” athletes against hamstring injuries?

Hamstring strain injury (HSI) has remained a problem for athletes across a range of sports that involve sprinting. In team sports such as soccer, HSI is responsible for more games lost than any other injury. Athletes with a history of HSI, or who are older, are at greater risk of injury. Although these risk factors cannot be controlled, there are other risk factors that can be addressed in the physical preparation of athletes. One risk factor is low hamstring strength, and it is common for strength and conditioning (S&C) coaches to prescribe hamstring strengthening exercises as part of an injury prevention program. The choice of exercises has become a controversial issue with practitioners debating the pros and cons of hip dominant or knee dominant exercises, as well as eccentric exercises (e.g. Nordic) versus isometric exercises. Read more