Posts

Why a technical philosophy is more important than a technical model

Earlier this week Nick Garcia wrote about how we think too much about good technique rather than what style will fit an individual athlete. Looking at the final technique is trying to reverse engineer the problem. What we should be looking at is the philosophy that it all started with. One thing that top coaches have in common is that they understand the throw and have an idea of what forces they want to create. How that looks and what the athlete needs to do to achieve it might result in different technique, but the core idea is front and center. Read more

Proficiency through progressions

Some coaches like to do things by feel. I’m not that type of coach. I’m a system guy. I like order and organization. In the weight room that means having a plan. And when I’m teaching technique it means having progressions. To me using progressions is like having a system. Read more

Rethinking drills for the hammer throw

Back in December, I invited Sergej Litinov to Zurich to present a workshop and work with some of the Swiss hammer throwers. Since I first got to train with Litvinov in 2004, I have been impressed by the different perspective he brings to the event. He conceptualizes the hammer throw different than any other thrower I know. Back in August 2017 and September 2018 he joined member hangouts to try and explain his approach, but only seeing him with with athletes in person do you really get to understand how to put the concepts into practice. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 184: Impacting basketball (with Joe Abunassar)

Basketball players have a reputation for being some of the most athletic individuals across all sports. Tall, big, fast, and agile, they seem to have it all. Joe Abunassar started off as a basketball coach before broadening his skillset to include strength and conditioning, skills training, and more. Now his team at Impact Basketball helps prepare athletes for all aspects of the game. On this week’s episode he joins us to discuss the physical needs of basketball, preparing athletes for them, and how skills training and physically training are linked. Read more

4 more things I learned from Frans Bosch

Two years ago I compiled list of four key points I learned from Frans Bosch’s work after reading his book Strength Training and Coordination: An Integrative Approach. Since then I’ve had the change to try out some of the concepts in training, talk more with Frans Bosch, and see how John Pryor has implemented the ideas. Therefore I thought it was time to add to that list. Read more

GAINcast Episode 136: The anatomy of agility part 2 (with Frans Bosch and John Pryor)

On last week’s GAINcast we started a discussion on agility with Frans Bosch and John Pryor, looking at transfer, traditional strength training, and common misconceptions of their work.Bosch and Pryor have formed a strong partnership that has helped redefine strength and conditioning by bringing together the science of coaching and art of coaching. On this week’s GAINcast we continue the conversation to look at the first step in implementing Bosch’s ideas, redefining general training, connecting movements, and more. Read more

A critical look at a constraints-led approach to training

Anyone reading HMMR media this month will be well informed on the work of Frans Bosch. Bosch is perhaps the world’s leading proponent of constraints-led learning and applying complex systems theory in the realm of athletic development, as he detailed in his book. As a strength and conditioning coach from a more classic strength training background, I have always found his work interesting and have enjoyed reading his ideas and listening to him talk. But before I jump on the bandwagon, I still see the need to take a critical look at a few some of the concepts, and, more importantly, how I see them being implemented in training. Read more

GAINcast Episode 135: The anatomy of agility – part 1 (with Frans Bosch and John Pryor)

The work of Frans Bosch and John Pryor has created a new discussion around strength training, coordination, and motor learning over the past few years. Bosch has been a thought leader, while Pryor has taken the application of the concepts to new levels in his work with Japan and Fiji rugby. Both are coming to the US in December for a series of seminars, and we got them to join the GAINcast for a two-part interview on a wide range of topics. Part 1 of our interview looks at how their work has evolved and how they began working together, transfer of training, the role of traditional strength training, and misinterpretations of Bosch’s work. Read more

Understanding the orbit in the hammer throw

Hammer throwers have a tendency to be isolated. To start with, we spend most of our times turning around in circles in a cage. But beyond that, we sometimes get so focused on what we are trying to do that we forget why we are trying to do that. Read more

GAINcast Episode 132: Learning to control (with John Kiely)

John Kiely has done some groundbreaking work on periodization, but that isn’t the only topic he is interested in. When it comes to his work with rugby, track and field, and soccer he focuses on making an impact through coordination. On this week’s podcast we take a look at the framework he uses to understand coordination, and how that translates into some surprising methods with athletes. Read more