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HMMR Podcast Episode 128: Ultimate Instability (with Paul Venner)

One of the paradoxes of training is that you can build stability through destabilizing an athlete. Paul Venner has taken the concept to the next level as founder of the equipment company Ultimate Instability and head of athletic performance for the Dutch Baseball and Softball Federation. He joins us on this episode of the podcast to discuss stability, motor learning, the concepts of his mentor Frans Bosch, and how strength coaches can bring value in these areas. Read more

GAINcast Episode 86: Forget Technique (with Jerry Clayton)

Few track and field coaches have put together as diverse a resume as Jerry Clayton. The University of Michigan head coach has coached 16 NCAA champions across nearly every field event, including a world champion in the high jump and multiple Olympians in the throws. The key to Clayton’s success is to focus less on the minutia of technique and more on getting athletes to feel the movement. On this episode of the podcast Clayton walks us through his approach to develop technique and strength. Read more

Ask Martin Vol. 32: Throwing Slow

Do you have a question for me? “Ask Martin” questions are chosen from inquiries submitted by members. So join now and you’ll also get access to a wealth of other training information.

After reading the “Training Fast and Slow” post, I started wondering about the various benefits of these training techniques for throwers. Is there ever a time to throw fast (light implements) or should a thrower only go slow (heavy implements)? Is there more benefit in one type of implement or another? -Andrew Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 99: Robust Running (with John Pryor)

The problem with speed training for field sports is that speed can be difficult to transfer to the field of play. In his work with Japan Rugby and several professional clubs John Pryor has sought out solutions to this problem, developing a system of robust running that helps players develop the skills to hit the right positions in the various complex situations they might encounter on the field. In this episode we sit down with Pryor to discuss his approach to speed training for field sport athletes. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – January 2017

Welcome back to another monthly round up of recent research in the sports science world. This month we finally have some objective evidence on the use of high fat, low carbohydrate diets for elite athletes – perhaps this will lessen the debate, although I expect not. We also have a look at the training of elite endurance athletes, early versus late specialization in Olympic Athletes, sleep (as always), oxidative stress, and the use of hot baths after exercise, amongst others. Enjoy. Read more

Training Talk With Frans Bosch (Part 1)

One of the larger influences on my coaching over the past year has been Frans Bosch. His recent book on strength training and coordination does not offer all the answers, but it has gotten me to think in detail about my approach. At the end of the year I reflected on four things I had learned from the book. But at the sam time I see how many of the concepts in the book are misunderstood and also have many questions myself. After meeting Bosch for the first time last summer I have kept in touch and had the chance to ask him some questions about the book recently. Read more

Back to Basics of Coaching

Each year I reread the following books to keep in touch with the basics. My roots are deep in Athletics (Track & Field) so you can see that reflected in these reading. I find that every time I go through these books that I find something new or at least different perspective. This is just one way that I work at getting better at getting better. In my opinion if you want to be a coach you need to have a “go to” list like this that will keep in touch with the foundations of coaching. Read more

Episode 49: To Drill or Not To Drill

As Nick wrote in a post last week, he is all for drills. I am more of a skeptic in the drill department, having seen so many worthless drills over my career. But as usual, there are some common points we can agree on and in this episode we discuss drills and try to find the proper place for them in training. Read more

The Case for Drills

As a young inexperienced coach it was my goal, like most all coaches, to be the best I possibly could be. The way I figured I was going to do this was by first distinguishing who had the best program and then seeking out the coach of this program. This quest actually began when I started my junior college throwing career. At this time there was no question that coach Art Venegas and the UCLA Bruins were at the top. I distinctly remember going to my first major track meet, the Pac 10 Conference Championships hosted by Stanford University, to watch the Bruins live in action. I could not wait to see them throw and oddly enough my seats were right in front of Coach Venegas. I listened to every word and every cue he gave his throwers. Although, I was relatively inexperienced, especially having zero knowledge about the rotation, I noticed right away that the Bruins had distinct characteristics in their technique. Little did I know that in the future I would be competing against the Bruins while attending college at Cal State Northridge. Read more

Some Thoughts on Changing Practice

Changing practice can change the game only if practice is effective. Here are some of the keys to effective practice that I have found to work: Read more