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GAINcast Episode 117: Moving, fast and slow

Movement is the foundational feature of sport. If you can’t move, you can’t play. Heck, it’s the foundational feature of life. Looking back at history, if you couldn’t move, you wouldn’t eat. On this episode of the GAINcast we talk about the basic principles of good movement, building better foundational movements, and helping athletes connect them through training progressions. Read more

Training the legs better

Last month on the podcast, Martin and I discussed some of the various training methods we use to target leg strength. As this month’s HMMR Media site theme is “beyond the barbell” it made sense for us to dig a little deeper into the methods we use outside the weight room and what options are available to coaches in this regard. Read more

Why? Why not?

Why does the Newtonian, mechanistic reductionist approach that focuses on minutiae and the parts persist? Why not a quantum approach that focuses on relationships and connections, flow and rhythm. The former is comfortable because it allows people cleaner definitions and seemingly straightforward solutions, in some ways it is simplistic because all you have to do in that approach is be a technician. If you understand how all the muscles work, what inhibits, what lengthens, what you need to activate and then what you need to integrate it all fits into a neat clean little box. Just follow the algorithm and push a few buttons and everything is fixed. Read more

Does off-field speed transfer to on-field speed?

This month’s theme on HMMR Media is transfer of training, and to kick it off I thought I would take a timely example of just how complex transfer can be. What you think has carry over to your sport is not always as simple as it seems. Read more

A guide to assessing trainability

As we discuss all the time, athletic development does not follow a fixed linear path. It is a journey where two athletes of the same age can start at completely different points even though they might end up in the same place. For coaches, this creates some problems: how do you know where to start with an athlete you inherit and how do you track their progress? Read more

Developing a Training System

My concepts of training are based on study of past training methods, sports science research, best practice, and practical experience working with all levels of athlete. When developing a training system you learn through deliberate practice, through trial and error, you learn in the trenches, not just in a book, a classroom or a laboratory. You learn from your mistakes and your successes. Read more

GAINcast Episode 35: The Art and Science of Coaching Baseball (with Paul Davis)

Baseball is a sport that oscillates between tradition and modern analytics. Coaches like Paul Davis of the St. Louis Cardinals try to find a balance in the middle. As a developmental pitching coordinator and coach he has to understand the science of movement and the art of coaching. On this episode Davis joins us to walk through his approach to developing pitchers as athletes. Read more

GAINcast Episode 2: Train Movements Not Muscles

Vern has a few quotes he is famous for, and perhaps none more so than telling coaches to “Train movements, not muscles.” This is one of the foundations of his philosophy and it helps to take a step back and look at why it is so important. Therefore on the question we address on this episode of the GAINcast is:

This Episode’s Question: Why is it so important to train movements instead of muscles? And how do we do that?

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HMMR Podcast Episode 35: Movement Mastery (with Shawn Myszka)

Movement is the key to sport. As Vern always says, we need to train movements, not muscles. On this week’s podcast we are joined by Shawn Myszka to discuss motor learning, movement analysis, and improving movement through specific strength exercises. Read more

Play

PLAY first! – That is where it all starts. Sport is not supposed to be work it is play. Start with free play that is natural and instinctive; it does not require coaching or supervision. In free play the children, not the adults, determine the structure so they follow their instincts and explore all dimensions of movement with the only limitations their imaginations. Read more