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HMMR Podcast Episode 107: Performance Nutrition (with Kyle Pfaffenbach)

Nutrition is a field with some exciting developments and trends, but it is also one filled with pseudoscience and gurus. On this week’s episode consultant and professor Kyle Pfaffenbach joins us to talk about how athletes and coaches can make sense of nutrition. We discuss how to create buy-in, nutrient timing, how to individualize nutrition, and more.

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Pfaffenbach teaches at Eastern Oregon University and is also a consultant to many elite athletes including work with the Brooks Beasts Track Club. To start off the episode he discussed how a consultant can best bring about change:

Often athletes need peace of mind as much as a magic formula when it comes to nutrition consulting. Click To Tweet

The heart of the episode focused on nutrition itself:

Just like training, there is no nutrition formula. Find what works best for each athlete. Click To Tweet It’s not just about your competition meal plan; it’s your every day nutrition that counts. Click To Tweet

Diet and performance nutrition shouldn’t be about control or conquering; you should enjoy food. Click To Tweet

Pfaffenbach also has a deep interest in nutrient timing and we went into some detail on key points for both power athletes and endurance athletes.

It’s not about the stress itself. You don’t benefit from training unless you adapt to the stress. Click To Tweet

To hear more about nutrition, listen to the full episode above. Also be sure to subscribe to our podcast and review it on iTunes.

Further Reading

The following links were referenced in the podcast or provide some additional reading material on the topic:

Sports Science Monthly – June 2017

Welcome back to another installment of sports science monthly. We kick off this month with a look at strength training frequency and how it might represent a worthwhile avenue for exploration in well-trained athletes looking to gain muscle. We also have a review article examining nutritional periodization, how beliefs can affect how much of an improvement you see from a sports supplement, a case report on rhabdomyolysis, and a look at a new model proposed to explain fatigue. Let’s get going. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – May 2017

This month we take a look at new research on how genetic variations might affect psychological skills, the differences between physiological and biomechanical training load monitoring, synthetic tendons, and practical issues in sports nutrition. To start off with, however, we dive into the interplay between energy intake and overtraining syndrome. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 75: Science and Nutrition (with Craig Pickering)

The nutrition world is so filled with gurus and pseudo science that it can be difficult to separate the truth from fiction. Olympian and HMMR Media sports science correspondent Craig Pickering joins this week’s episode to give us an update on the latest research and insights from the world of nutrition and what that means to us as athletes. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – October 2016

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Welcome back to another edition of this column. We have plenty of things to look at this month, including a few hot topics in sports nutrition – gluten, beetroot juice, carbohydrates, and vegetarians – as well as a look at a bit of research that examines how subconscious cues can affect exercise performance. We also have a stab at answering other questions like “just how bad are injuries?” Read more

Sports Science Monthly – September 2016

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This month, we look at a wide range of disciplines, with studies coming from sports psychology, sports nutrition, strength and conditioning, and biomechanics – and, as always, we finish off with a quick fire round up. The first overview will be free for everyone, but to read the complete September edition you must be a HMMR Plus Member. HMMR Plus is a new offering we have that gives users access to exclusive content like our article archive, webinars, online meet ups, and of course Sports Science Monthly. Therefore sign up now to gain access to Sports Science Monthly and more. To see what Sports Science Monthly is about, our April and May editions are available for free. With that said, let’s dive in! Read more

Sports Science Monthly – July 2016

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Welcome back to the fourth installment of Sports Science Monthly. This month we will be taking a closer look at a wide range of recent research on topics ranging from sleep to social media for athletes. The first overview is free. To access the summaries other the remaining topics you need to be a HMMR Plus Member. HMMR Plus is a new offering we have that gives users access to exclusive content like our article archive, webinars, online meet ups, and of course Sports Science Monthly. Therefore sign up now to gain access to Sports Science Monthly and more. To see what Sports Science Monthly is about, our April and May editions are available for free. Read more

What Should We Eat When We Get Injured?

Are you an athlete? Then I’ve got some bad news for you; you’re going to get injured. But you likely knew that already. Estimates of injury rates in sports people vary, but one injury per 100 hours in training or competition is a fairly moderate estimate; anyone doing any sort of training for a length of time will eventually get some sort of injury. Read more

Throwing and Health Part II: Internal Health

In Throwing and Health Part 1: Joint Injuries, I examined the influence of training as a thrower and some of the implications that would have on joint health. Today I want to talk a little more about health from the internal perspective

On my first day of college I weighed in at 228 pounds (103kg), after the first year I had increased my strength and weight to a great degree. At the end of my freshman year, I weighed in at near 256 pounds (116kg). My diet was simple, better known as the “seafood diet” by those of us on the team . . . “YOU SEE FOOD, YOU EAT IT” was the methodology! Along with all of the food, I consumed extra protein, carbohydrates, creatine monohydrate and glutamine daily. I was on a very similar plan nutritionally as most of the football players at our university. Bigger-Faster-Stronger was also a known motto for what we wanted from training. The late Stefan Fernholm was a legend in throwing and specifically for his speed-power training feats at such a large body weight.
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What I’ve Learned Over 15+ Years of Trying to “Eat Healthy”

The Background Story

Yes, that’s really me at 10 years old.

Yes, that’s really me at 10 years old.

Most people don’t know it, but I used to be a chubby kid. Like a 28% body fat, husky-jean wearing chubby kid. I used to be that kid that wore his t-shirt in the pool (like I was fooling anyone…) and a big highlight of my summer was defending my championship in the big splash contest at the local pool. Then, one random day in 7th grade P.E., we had the local performance academy guys bring some weights to our school and as cheesy as it sounds, my life was changed forever. I instantly fell in love with lifting weights and I used this new love of strength training to combat my bad diet for a few years, but it wasn’t until my last couple years in high school that I really dove into nutrition and began to see my body really change. My first day of college football in  August 2004, I weighed in at 204lbs and 7.6% body fat. To this day, I still maintain a body fat between 8-12% at a body weight of 240-250lbs.
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