Posts

Book Club: Ray Dalio’s Principles

What are the rules that consistently govern your actions? What do you turn to when faced with challenging circumstances or unique opportunities? How do you know if what you’re doing aligns with what you believe or with who you are? Though it seems elementary to one’s ability to function at a high level, so few people have actually taken the time to write out who they are and what they believe in. Read more

Four Laws for Life and Training

On last week’s GAINcast Vern and I discussed the importance of connections in training. When it comes down to it, performance is about making connections. At one level it is about connecting muscles and joints to move together with optimal coordination. At another level it is about connecting ideas from different disciplines to find the best way to guide your athlete. At both levels we can learn a lot by looking at the field of ecology. Ecology, by its very nature, is a discipline devoted to connections: it is a branch of biology that deals with the relations of organisms to one another and to their physical surroundings. Barry Commoner was a leading ecologist and his 1971 book The Closing Circle was pivotal in helping bring about the modern environmental movement. Whether you are a tree hugger or not, in reading through his work you cannot help but see that much of it can be applied 1:1 in sport. Read more

Why I Am Retiring From Coaching In 5 Years

An undeniable law of existence is that there is an expiration date to everything. You see this wisdom express in every text of spirituality across the globe. In Judeo-Christian traditions this truth is succinctly discussed in the the Old Testament in Ecclesiastes 3 which is commonly known as the “A Time For Everything” chapter. This truth is a focus in Taoism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, and Native American traditions as well as numerous others. Many philosophers, scientists, and artist know this as well. The inescapable intelligence of term limits is a deep enteral wisdom. Why then it is common practice to coach with an open ended timeline? Read more

Words of Wisdom, Volume 9

With the holiday season here I am in a bit of a philosophical mood. So for this Words of Wisdom post I decided take a look at a few quotes that get to a key point at the heart of my own training philosophy. Read more

Words of Wisdom, Volume 8

Our jobs would be a lot easier if we could just copy and paste training programs for our athletes. But that is rarely what works to produce results, as Nick and I discussed on the HMMR Media Podcast last month. It also is boring; a robot can copy and paste results after all. What makes coaching so fun and interesting is that it is challenging. In this Words of Wisdom I bring together some quotes I have come across recently that demonstrate the importance of finding your own unique solution as a coach, and a unique solution for your athletes. Read more

The Antifragile Athlete

I’m a little late on the bandwagon, but I finally sat down with Nassim Taleb’s bestselling book Antifragile: Things That Gain From Disorder earlier in the month. I’ve given the book some time to settle and it has already influenced my thoughts on training more than any of the training-related books I have read recently. Read more

Sound Mind, Sound Body

Sanzio_01_Plato_AristotleAs an undergraduate I majored in a topic that some considered the antithesis of my athletic pursuits: philosophy. My training was focused on my body and my studies were focused on the mind. They couldn’t be further apart, right? But one of the big things I learned from my studies is that they are closer than you think. And bear with me as I put this in context so that I can bring it back around to coaching. Read more

More Reasons Why We Throw

The #whyithrow tweets have died off, so I figured it was time to share the last responses to our simple question: why do you throw? It was great to get so much feedback. We all have great reasons for throwing, so let’s keep it up and help this sport grow.

→ Related Content: Read why US champion Kibwé Johnson throws, why I throw, and the first set of responses to our question.
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Why We Throw

I told you why I keep throwing after all these years. Kibwe told you why he used to throw and why he throws now. But we weren’t the only ones. Here are ten more responses to our question from Twitter.

Let us know why you throw by posting on social media with the hashtag #whyithrow. Or simply leave a comment below. This is a diverse sport and we all come to it for different reasons. We’d like to hear your story.
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#whyithrow

I used to throw because it came easy.
Then I threw because it challenged me.
Then I threw to be a champion.
Then I threw to to do something that had never been done.
Then I threw to be an Olympian.
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