Posts

Over recovery syndrome

I have identified a new syndrome – the over-recovered athlete. I look at the landscape and I see athletes and teams spending as much or more time doing ice baths, cryotherapy massage etc. as they do in actual training. Rest and recovery are fine and necessary but only of benefit if you first do the necessary work. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – June 2018

Welcome back to another edition of Sports Science Monthly. This month, we take a closer look at warm downs, ice baths, carbohydrates, and some new findings regarding sleep in athletes. Read more

Looking beyond the headlines: putting research in context

Research studies often get big headlines in the popular science media, which can be eye-catching. In today’s media saturated world, a quick headline on social media is all many of us have time for. This, of course, can lead to us not getting the full picture, and having what we do in our day-to-day negatively impacted through the incorrect application of this information. Read more

December 2017 in review: rest and recovery

After focusing on getting back to the basics in October and adaptation in November, we turned our attention to a new site theme in December: rest and recovery. Throughout the month we compiled best practices in this area from top coaches, including Dean Benton (English Rugby), Mike Bahn (formerly of US Ski), Nick Lumley (Edinburgh Rugby) and Vern Gambetta. We also got input from Matt Foreman on recovery as you age, and Craig Pickering on some of the science behind recovery. Combined, it will get you thinking about how to approach the topic going forward. Read more

GAINcast Episode 97: Recovery

The theme this month on HMMR Media is recovery. Recovery is a tricky area to navigate, with decisions often influenced as much by traditions, new technology, or pseudoscience as by research and common sense. On this episode of the GAINcast, Vern walks through the science of recovery, his approach, and what questions coaches need to be asking. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 134: Endure and Recover (with Nick Lumley)

When it comes down to it, much of sports training is about being able to endure more and come back and do it again. These are both points that rugby strength coach Nick Lumley has focussed on since taking over his role at Edinburgh Rugby this summer. He comes back on the podcast this week to explain how he has tried to improve body composition, increase endurance, and optimize recovery for his team. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – November 2017

This month, we start with a lengthily mini-review, looking at gaining a fuller understanding of how exercise causes adaptation. This is obviously paramount to coaches, because causing adaptations is what we’re interesting in; being able to understand the underpinnings of this can be useful. It gets a little heavy in places, but keep going and I’m sure you’ll find something useful within it. After that, we move back into the regular format; this month, we have a closer look at massage, repeated sprints as a marker of hamstring rehabilitation status, and the 24-hour athlete, along with a rapid-fire round-up at the end. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – September 2017

Welcome back to another edition of Sports Science Monthly. This month we take a look at the practical use of sports science in coaching, and issues that arise in that relationship; the effect of body mass on ice baths; the impact of genetic variation on concussion risk; recovery for team sports; placebo effect; and individualized training based on HRV. Read more

In Defense of Laziness

Recently, I came across an interesting discussion on social media, pre-empted by this tweet from @damselndadugout: Read more

Is There a Balance to Sports Training?

There has been a lot of talk about balance on this site over the past few weeks. Initially, Martin wrote about Peak Performance, ther new book from Steve Magness and Brad Stulberg. In his review, Martin discussed his own search for work-life balance, and how it may well be crucial in order to be successful. This article was followed up by “Balance and The Barbell Strategy”, which examines how a true balanced approach lies not in the middle, but at the two extremes. Read more