Posts

Preparing the body to change direction

The purpose of this article is to give any readers an insight into how I think about and prepare people for change of direction tasks. These change of direction tasks are simply that, not agility tasks. We want athletes to be able to change direction powerfully, quickly and efficiently in competition. In preparation, I like to look at these qualities in reverse: efficiency, speed and power. Change of direction all starts with promoting efficiency by understanding the attractors of the movement. Read more

Using the hamstrings to better assess ACL return to sport readiness

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common sports-related injury. While conservative treatments are available, the most common treatment for sports population is the surgical reconstruction of the ligament and it is increasingly common to use hamstrings tendons autograft is such operations. 1,2,3,4,5 Read more

Using foundational leg exercises as the cornerstone of rehabilitation

Usually any injury negatively affects movement patterns in the short term and, if left unaddressed, indefinitely. Whether it be due to pain, inhibition or central motor control changes these alterations in movement need to be addressed early, consistently and progressively in a rehabilitation program. Good quality, simple movement in rehab is the cornerstone to regaining function. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 218: From the ground up (with Matt Siniscalchi)

Whether you are building or rebuilding an athlete, you have to start from the ground up. Begin with what they can do and build upon it until you get them doing the things fundamental for their sport. Matt Siniscalchi has worked at all levels of the sport, from youth football academy players, to his current role helping world champions back from injury. The challenges are always changing, but the philosophy remains the same. On this week’s podcast Siniscalchi joins us to discuss this philosophy, and dive in detail into progressions and strength training for athletes recovering from injury. Read more

Mitigating risk in reactive strength training

Reactive strength training places quite a specific tissue load on the body. The rapid stretch-shortening effect of the acting chain of muscles, tendons and connective tissues is seen by more conservative physiotherapists as risky and they think it should be avoided for the most part. This presents a disconnect between how a sport is performance and how injured athletes begin to their return to play preparations. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – October 2019

Every month we take a deep dive into the latest research in sports science. With the World Athletics Championships having just finished, the October Sports Science Monthly look at a plethora of new research on the sport featured recently in Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, ranging from looking at injury data from the sport, pacing, and more.. We then also dive into additional topics like pillars of injury rehabilitation, developing mental toughness, and altitude training. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 204: Reconditioning (with Leigh Egger)

Healing an injury is only one step in the complex process to return an injured athlete to the field. Being on the sidelines can have a large impact on the physical and psychological condition of an athlete, which also needs to be addressed in the return to play process. In other words, we need to recondition the athlete. Physiotherapist, athletic development coach, and footballer Leigh Egger joins this week’s podcast to talk about the process of reconditioning and helping injured athletes. Read more

Understanding and testing for stability in the context of power generation in sport

This article was co-authored by Peter Colagiuri with the help of Leigh Egger, colleagues at BioAthletic. Colagiuri will release an app for sports injury diagnosis later this year. You can learn more at Sports Injury Online.

There are various components required to create power in the context of athletic performance. Single leg power tasks include cutting or agility during running, jumping for a ball while running and during sprint take off. These tasks are integral in most sports yet a significant portion of our gym based strength training focuses on double leg strength and power. Squats and deadlifts are great for building muscle function but don’t provide a comprehensive platform for athletic function. In order to successfully train and rehabilitate athletes to full athletic performance, we need to ensure that all aspects of performance are adequately addressed. Read more

The role of plyometrics in injury rehabilitation

This article was co-authored with my colleague Peter Colagiuri at BioAthletic. Colagiuri is releasing an upcoming app for sports injury diagnosis. You can learn more at Sports Injury Online.

When we talk about plyometrics, we are talking about a very broad category of movements. The one thing they have in common is that they involve rapid stretching and shortening of contractile and elastic components of muscle. When it comes to rehabilitation, this category is unfortunately often brushed over or completely forgotten. In this article we hope to show some ideas on how and why plyometrics should be included in the rehabilitation spectrum. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 162: Find the right fit (with Boo Schexnayder)

Coach Boo Schexnayder found an interesting situation last year: LSU had asked him to step in and help coach events he hadn’t worked with in decades. The transition was easy for him in part because his training is based on the individual, not the event. He’s used that approach to produce world-class jumpers for decades, and this year it help produced some top throwers too. On this episode of the podcast Schexnayder joins us to discuss his approach to individualization and finding the right fit for an athlete. Read more