Posts

Assessing assessments in rehab

All projects have a starting point. A chance to take stock, get the lay of the land, and analyze needs. In rehabilitation and performance this is usually some form of a physical assessment. In order to start with rehabilitation, you have to know where you are beginning from. This is what the assessment process aims for. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 231: Rethinking rehab (with Donie Fox)

It’s easy to think about injury from a medical point of view and focus on what is broken. But you can also view it from a performance point of view: what type of plan will take the athlete is at point A to point B. Donie Fox is both a physiotherapist and athletic development coach. He joins this week’s podcast to discuss his thoughts on rehabilitation, including assessment, variation, shapes, and more. Read more

GAINcast Episode 197: Repetition without repetition (with Grace Golden)

Traditionally the rehabilitation process chases pristine movements. Grace Golden has a different approach: explore permutations of each movement and force the athlete to respond to their environment. After presenting at last month’s GAIN Master Class, Grace Golden joins this week’s GAINcast to discuss her principles of rehabilitation, as well as how to create a team approach to returning athletes to play. Read more

Education as part of the journey of reconditioning

The athletic development community has recently looked more at physical education and how it can assist athletes. Much of the discussion centers around the coordinative development of movement and how to develop higher levels of trainability/physical literacy/physical competency. But physical education is more than just doing, it is also understanding. This cognitive aspect of physical education is central in the reconditioning process. Athletes that are educated about the cause of injury, healing process, and training in general will generally have better outcomes. Read more

Preparing the body to change direction

The purpose of this article is to give any readers an insight into how I think about and prepare people for change of direction tasks. These change of direction tasks are simply that, not agility tasks. We want athletes to be able to change direction powerfully, quickly and efficiently in competition. In preparation, I like to look at these qualities in reverse: efficiency, speed and power. Change of direction all starts with promoting efficiency by understanding the attractors of the movement. Read more

Using the hamstrings to better assess ACL return to sport readiness

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common sports-related injury. While conservative treatments are available, the most common treatment for sports population is the surgical reconstruction of the ligament and it is increasingly common to use hamstrings tendons autograft is such operations. 1,2,3,4,5 Read more

Using foundational leg exercises as the cornerstone of rehabilitation

Usually any injury negatively affects movement patterns in the short term and, if left unaddressed, indefinitely. Whether it be due to pain, inhibition or central motor control changes these alterations in movement need to be addressed early, consistently and progressively in a rehabilitation program. Good quality, simple movement in rehab is the cornerstone to regaining function. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 218: From the ground up (with Matt Siniscalchi)

Whether you are building or rebuilding an athlete, you have to start from the ground up. Begin with what they can do and build upon it until you get them doing the things fundamental for their sport. Matt Siniscalchi has worked at all levels of the sport, from youth football academy players, to his current role helping world champions back from injury. The challenges are always changing, but the philosophy remains the same. On this week’s podcast Siniscalchi joins us to discuss this philosophy, and dive in detail into progressions and strength training for athletes recovering from injury. Read more

Mitigating risk in reactive strength training

Reactive strength training places quite a specific tissue load on the body. The rapid stretch-shortening effect of the acting chain of muscles, tendons and connective tissues is seen by more conservative physiotherapists as risky and they think it should be avoided for the most part. This presents a disconnect between how a sport is performance and how injured athletes begin to their return to play preparations. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – October 2019

Every month we take a deep dive into the latest research in sports science. With the World Athletics Championships having just finished, the October Sports Science Monthly look at a plethora of new research on the sport featured recently in Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, ranging from looking at injury data from the sport, pacing, and more.. We then also dive into additional topics like pillars of injury rehabilitation, developing mental toughness, and altitude training. Read more