Posts

Moving beyond dynamic correspondence

Start talking about special strength or specific strength and one of the first things that often comes up is Yuri Verkhoshansky and the principle of dynamic correspondence. In our latest video lesson, I sat down with German national discus coach René Sack to discuss his framework for specific strength and how he applies it to discus throwers. What stood out to me the most is how big of a gap there is between the theory of special strength and how it is put into practice by top coaches. Dynamic correspondence might look good on paper, but top coaches like René are finding different ways to make specific strength effective in training. Read more

Training must be sport specific!

Sport specific training is not a myth, it is a must. Each sport has unique demands that must be addressed in training. Lest we forget training is not just preparing the athlete for the demands of competition but also for the demands of the actual practice of the sport, practice demands will often exceed game demands through the shear repetition of movements and skills. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 191: Sports specific bulls**t (with Michael Boyle)

Mike Boyle sparked an online debate when he called out sports specific training last month. In his opinion, no matter the sport, 90% of training doesn’t change. As an elite coach who has worked with dozens of professional sports, he has seen first hand what needs to be tailored to the sport, and what applies to all sports. On this week’s episode he joins us to talk shop about his approach to sport specific training and where it often goes wrong. Read more

GAINcast Episode 148: Change the game

How do we change how we prepare for the game? Vern has spent his career working on answering this question across a variety of sports. On this week’s GAINcast he shares some thoughts and reflections on how to change the game. Read more

4 more things I learned from Frans Bosch

Two years ago I compiled list of four key points I learned from Frans Bosch’s work after reading his book Strength Training and Coordination: An Integrative Approach. Since then I’ve had the change to try out some of the concepts in training, talk more with Frans Bosch, and see how John Pryor has implemented the ideas. Therefore I thought it was time to add to that list. Read more

What exercise classification can and can’t do for your training

You can classify exercises in a number of ways: on a scale of specificity, by the plane of movement, by degrees of freedom, by the speed of movement, or through various other methods. One approach is that of Anatoli Bondarchuk, who we have covered many times on our podcast and in our webinar on his training methods, which divides exercises into four categories based on his definition of specificity. In talking with coaches over the past few years, his method provides a simple tool that coaches in any spot can implement. But let’s be clear, it also has it’s limitations, like any method of exercise classification. Exercise classification is the start of a process, not the solution itself. There are certain things that exercise classification can and cannot do. Read more

Two methods to break down complex sports

In many ways, track and field coaches have it easy. When I am coaching a hammer thrower, for example, I have just one athlete to worry about, one movement to train for, and one technique to master. Athletes in open-skilled sports, on the other hand, have a much more difficult puzzle to put together. How do coaches decide what to focus on in training and programming in such a situation? Read more

Specificity of resistance training for sprinting

It is well accepted that training exercises must have similar characteristics to a competition movement to achieve a direct positive transfer of training. This is not to say that all training must be specific, as general training is important for developing foundation qualities, and for injury prevention. It is also well-known that developing athletes with a relatively low strength training age can achieve good transfer to performance without highly specific training exercises. But, nevertheless, this statement is a good starting point when looking at exercise selection for any sport that involves sprinting movements. Read more

GAINcast Episode 119: Resisted and assisted sprinting

As with anything, variation can help with the development of speed. Sprinted with varied amounts of resistance and assistance can help develop specific strength, power, and technique. On this week’s episode of the GAINcast we explain and evaluate the various methods for resisted and assisted sprinting, and discuss how to implmement them in training. Read more

HMMR in Houston

We’re proud to announce our next seminar tailored specifically to training for the throwing events. On June 16th Nick Garcia and I will be presenting at Rice University in Houston. Through both classroom instruction and demonstrations, we’ll show you various ways to program for the heavy throws, share our training plans, walk participants through key exercises and progressions, and more. It willl be a great opportunity to learn and see first hand how to put a program together in a variety of ways. Read more