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GAINcast Episode 139: Training speed (with Brian FitzGerald)

When it comes to high school sprinting, few can match the credentials of Brian FitzGerald. The 2016 USA Today national track coach of the year has led athletes to California state titles in each of the past four decades, including athletes named Athlete of the Year by Track and Field News. Behind the high level results are some basic training principles. He joins this week’s GAINcast to lay out his eight basic principles of speed training. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – October 2018

There are lots of hot topics covered in the October edition of Sports Science Monthly. We start off by looking at the transfer of different types of strength to sprinting, then see how monitoring can be taken best from theory to practice, before diving into density of high speed training, adductor strengthening, dehydration, transcranial direct current stimulation, and more. Read more

A critical look at a constraints-led approach to training

Anyone reading HMMR media this month will be well informed on the work of Frans Bosch. Bosch is perhaps the world’s leading proponent of constraints-led learning and applying complex systems theory in the realm of athletic development, as he detailed in his book. As a strength and conditioning coach from a more classic strength training background, I have always found his work interesting and have enjoyed reading his ideas and listening to him talk. But before I jump on the bandwagon, I still see the need to take a critical look at a few some of the concepts, and, more importantly, how I see them being implemented in training. Read more

Robust running: a constraints-led approach

Robust running is a topic that has been well covered by John Pryor on the HMMR Media website and classroom. It can be thought of as the ability to maintain consistent rhythm when negotiating different tasks or environments. By reinforcing a positive running posture, athletes build the ability to execute technical skills when presented with environmental perturbations such as defensive players. Training athletes to better handle such perturbations helps them execute skills at higher speeds in wider range of positions.

» Learn more: Frans Bosch and John Pryor will presenting a series of seminars in America this December.

The constraints-led approach popularized by Frans Bosch’s book Strength Training and Coordination: An Integrative Approach is one way of developing this positive running posture. This article will look in more detail at this approach in theory and practice.

Why use a constraints led approach?

The idea of a constraints-led approach is to add variability to a movement through changing the way the task is performed or the environment where the task is performed in. By doing so, you can reinforce the stable, economical components of a movement. To use Bosch’s terminology from motor learning, a variation in the task or environment can be thought of as a fluctuation and the economical component of a movement an attractor. Attractors are the stable parts of the movement that should appear in all situations. Fluctuations are the parts of the movement that adapt to the ever-changing environment such as a rugby match or the variation of a hitting a baseball pitch. Hence, the deeper an attractor is ingrained, the more stable that component will be when changes in the environment occur.

When looking at running, Bosch identifies eight key attractors in his book:

  1. Hip Lock (swing leg hip higher than stance leg hip);
  2. Swing Leg Retraction (timed hip, knee and ankle extension just prior to ground contact);
  3. Foot Plant from Above (foot strike towards the ground as parallel as possible to direction of GRF);
  4. Positive Running Position (legs more in front than behind, tall posture);
  5. Keeping the Head Still (minimal vertical head movement);
  6. Upper Body First (changes of direction initiated from shoulders/upper trunk);
  7. Extending Truck while Rotating (upper body rotation without effecting pelvis position); and
  8. Distributing Pressure when Deceleration (minimize loading on the knee).

By implementing a constraint in the task or environment, an athlete is put in a position to reinforce a certain attractor or to help the athlete find a movement solution. Instead of trying to coach minute details during sprinting, the constraint provides intrinsic feedback to the athlete. This type of intrinsic feedback would be labelled as knowledge of result information (KR), which I’ll explain a bit more below.

When compared to other types of feedback, KR has some big advantages. Augmented KR, such as giving the athlete feedback about how fast they ran, is another type of feedback. Providing more standard coaching feedback would be labelled augmented knowledge of performance information (KP). As Bosch states, “movements learned with a great deal of augmented KP feedback (i.e. coaching & correcting) are less stable and less reliable especially in stress situations – for instance during competition.”

Examples of constraints for sprinting

As stated above, task and environmental constraints provide intrinsic KR feedback that may ‘stick’ better during high pressure situations. Here are some examples for how constraints can be introduced into the task or environment to achieve this result.

  1. Task constraint: stick run

Often while running, athletes rotate around the longitudinal axis which impairs running efficiency. Instead of trying to coach the athlete not to rotate at toe-off with augmented KP feedback, providing the athlete with a stick to hold on the athletes back can give them KR feedback.

Athletes can simply hold a stick on their back as they would a barbell during a back squat. Another alternative is holding the stick overhead. The only coaching cue is to keep the stick as still as possible while sprinting. The athlete then gets intrinsic KR feedback by feeling whether the stick is moving or not. If the stick is kept still while running, then rotation has been minimized and body position has been changed for that repetition.

  1. Environmental constraint: mat run

Coaches can add an environmental constraint by randomly placing pieces of soft matting approximately 4-6cm thick along the ground for an athlete to sprint over. With this changed environment, the athlete has to find a movement solution to sprint over various densities and heights of ground without tripping over and falling.

In essence, three attractors of running are needed to perform this sprint successfully; swing leg retraction, foot plant from above and positive running position. If a forward knee position of the swing leg and a foot strike from slightly greater height aren’t achieved, then it is likely the athlete will kick the edge of the mat and trip. Likewise, if sufficient stiffness isn’t achieved through the timing of extension through hip, knee and ankle at ground contact then the athlete will have a hard time navigating the different surfaces to maintain their speed.

Game-specific constraints in training

Athletes don’t play the game with a stick on their back, but game-specific constraints can also be introduced into training to help develop robust running skills.

A recent research paper has investigated the effects of carrying a rugby ball on sprint kinetics, which provides a good example of how in-game constraints also affect running. When carrying a ball with two hands, maximum velocity was negatively affected and athletes saw slower split times after 20 meters compared to running without a ball, however were able to accelerate to 20 meters just as well. Carrying the ball with one hand saw negative effects on acceleration, but similar maximum velocities reached when compared to running without a ball.

The reasons for the changes in acceleration and maximum velocity were due to changes in the mechanics of sprinting with each constraint. The negative acceleration effect seen while running with the ball in one hand appears to occur due to a possible asymmetry in the upper to lower body counterbalance. i.e. the arms both don’t drive straight, rather the arm carrying the ball tends to drift across the body disrupting normal sprint mechanics. In contrast, sprinting with the ball in two hands may have created an upper to lower body counter balance similar to that of sprinting with no ball as there were no significant differences in split times between ball in two hands vs no ball conditions in the first 20 meters.

As you can see, athletes might want to hold the ball in different ways in order to accelerate and reach high speed optimally. Ideally, an athlete would start running with the ball in two hands and then transfer it to one hand at approximately 20 meters. However, this isn’t always possible due to the unpredictable nature of sport where you may have defenders close by that require an evasive maneuver to beat. Some tasks simply require two hands (picking up a ball, receiving a pass, giving a pass, etc.) and some call for one hand (top speed on a runaway, while fending off an opponent, etc.).

Therefore athletes should be able to easily switch ball positions while running, and this can be a constraint introduced into running drills to help ensure attractors express themselves in all varieties of running. Using a ball during speed training knowing that you can reach similar force, velocity, and power numbers as sprinting with no ball during different phases of the sprint. The addition of the ball in hand(s) can potentially be used as a specific task constraint or paired with other constraints in a session to reinforce certain attractors prior to sprinting with a ball.

Creating options

In the end, the goal of athletes in all sports is to have options. John Pryor has talked about how he trained rugby players to create options: they are a more potent offensive threat if they run in a way that gives them the option to pass, kick, or turn at all times. This is the end goal of robust running. If a constraints led approach is something that interests you, check out John Pryor’s work on the HMMR Media classroom. He has great examples of how you can use different environmental and task constraints to reinforce certain attractors of running.

GAINcast Episode 132: Learning to control (with John Kiely)

John Kiely has done some groundbreaking work on periodization, but that isn’t the only topic he is interested in. When it comes to his work with rugby, track and field, and soccer he focuses on making an impact through coordination. On this week’s podcast we take a look at the framework he uses to understand coordination, and how that translates into some surprising methods with athletes. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 168: Rethinking rugby training (with James de Lacey)

Like most sports, rugby union has its traditions when it comes to training methods. Unlike most sports, those traditions do not always run as deep. The sport has only been professional for two decades, meaning that many more coaches are openly exploring how they can do things differently and better. James de Lacey is the incoming head of strength and conditioning for Romanian Rugby. He joins us on this week’s episode to discuss some of the areas he has been looking at changing those traditions, from weekly planning, to contact conditioning, and sprint training. Read more

GAINcast Episode 126: The basics checklist

The basics are crucial in training. If you don’t get the basics right then everything that follows will be compromised. But with all the talk of basics, what exactly are they? On this week’s GAINcast we look in depth at Vern’s eight key components of the basics, and related training factors. Read more

Individualization made easy

This month’s topic on HMMRMedia is the individualization of training. The one size fits all model is a thing of the past; both scientific research and hard won experience have shown the need to individualize training. But many coaches still struggle to figure out how to start with individualization. Read more

Athletic development: the basics

When I was growing there was a TV program about two detectives on the LA Police department. It was called Dragnet, the main character was Sargent Joe Friday, Badge 714, his famous line was “just the facts” when talking to a witness. To paraphrase Sargent Friday in coaching athletes to be better it all comes down to “just the basics.” That being said I have come to the realization that there is often not a good understanding of what the basics are. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 162: Find the right fit (with Boo Schexnayder)

Coach Boo Schexnayder found an interesting situation last year: LSU had asked him to step in and help coach events he hadn’t worked with in decades. The transition was easy for him in part because his training is based on the individual, not the event. He’s used that approach to produce world-class jumpers for decades, and this year it help produced some top throwers too. On this episode of the podcast Schexnayder joins us to discuss his approach to individualization and finding the right fit for an athlete. Read more