Posts

What if the evidence is flawed?

There is a stampede toward evidence based practice in medicine and sport science, but as I take a step back and look at this I have some very profound concerns. The biggest concern is what if the evidence is flawed? I encourage you to read the article “Why Most Published Research Findings Are False” by John P. A. Ioannidis. It is the most downloaded technical paper from the journal PLoS Medicine. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – April 2017

Welcome back to another edition of the monthly round up of sports science research. This month we have a look at a program for preventing hamstring injuries in sprinters, a bit on running economy, beta-alanine, blood flow restricted training, vitamin D, and the All Blacks Rugby Team. Enjoy! Read more

GAINcast Episode 59: Take It to the Limit (with Dr. Michael Joyner)

How far can we take the human body? Can we break two hours in the marathon? Or will Usain Bolt’s records ever fall? Dr. Michael Joyner of the Mayo Clinic has spent his career asking that very question. On this week’s episode of the GAINcast, Dr. Joyner joins us to discuss the limits of human performance, what training and sports science need to improve upon to take us there, and more. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – March 2017

This month we take a look at a wide range of different findings in the field of sports science. To begin with, we have a consensus statement on immunity within athletes, followed by papers examining issues such as the best exercise for hamstring strength, postactivation potentiation, overtraining, readiness to train, as well as a quick fire round up to finish. Read more

Do Non-Responders To Exercise Exist?

When we exercise, we expect to see improvements in health, fitness, or both. However, substantial research over the past couple of decades has illustrated that the magnitude of training improvements is highly variable between individuals, and a small number of people show no, or perhaps even negative, improvements to an exercise training intervention. These individuals are typically referred to as “non-responders.” Whis phenomenon is not unique to exercise, but new research is finally starting to take a closer look at this topic. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – February 2017

In this edition of the Sports Monthly we have a mini-review on the recent research looking at athlete monitoring, and how this accumulated fatigue may predict injury risk. We also have some research on mental fatigue, and how it affects sporting performance, issues affecting warm ups, and hamstring injury prevention. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 90: Method Man (with Bryan Mann)

Professor and practitioner Bryan Mann from the University of Missouri joins our episode for the third time to discuss turning ideas into methods. Many more coaches have now started to use velocity tracking devices, but how do you create a method out of it? Mann shares his thoughts, and also discusses the latest research on velocity-based training, new technology, his new book, and different methods to easily individualize training such as APRE. Read more

Unforgiving, Relentless and Undefeated

I am not talking about the UConn women’s basketball that just won their 100th straight game or the New England Patriots. I am talking about two of the greatest athletes ever! Who are they? You know them because you compete with them all day everyday. One is invisible but beats you every time. The other is always underfoot, but because it is so familiar we fail to recognize it. I am talking about gravity and the ground. Read more

Sports Science?

I see more gobbledygook and sciency stuff called “sports science” going on today that ever in my years as athlete and coach. Has anyone taken a step back and honestly assessed where we are going with all this? Everybody and anybody who administers a wellness survey or monitors some physiological function now calls themselves a sports scientist. Over the course of my career I have had the opportunity to work with some the greatest exercise physiologists, biomechanists, sports psychologists and motor learning/skill acquisition experts ever. I have seen how these professionals work as part of a performance team, backstage, not onstage claiming super bowl wins, world cup wins or Olympic goal medals. We were all part of a performance team with a clear goal working in one direction to make the athlete or team better. The great performance teams that I have worked in and seen work are coach driven. This demands that the sport coach be educated to ask the right questions and know how to direct the efforts. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – January 2017

Welcome back to another monthly round up of recent research in the sports science world. This month we finally have some objective evidence on the use of high fat, low carbohydrate diets for elite athletes – perhaps this will lessen the debate, although I expect not. We also have a look at the training of elite endurance athletes, early versus late specialization in Olympic Athletes, sleep (as always), oxidative stress, and the use of hot baths after exercise, amongst others. Enjoy. Read more