A Day in the Life, Version 2.0

A little over a year ago I posted about what a day in the life of a hammer thrower looked like. At the time I was basically training full time in Canada, so although I spent many hours training, my day also featured some down time.

With my new job, I figured it was time to post an updated “day in the life” post. I think that the schedule below is probably more typical for the hammer throwers I know. The hammer throw is not a high paying sport, so a job is a necessity for most. And with a job comes the need for flexibility. In Canada my schedule would never vary. In Zurich, a late afternoon conference call may force me to move my afternoon training session to lunch and turn my lunch into a quick sandwich on the go.

But despite the need for flexibility, I have not yet been too frustrated by the busy schedule. As I’ve said before, I like the balance a job provides. I get to spend part of my day with physical pursuits and part of my day with intellectual pursuits. The challenge of doing both, and succeeding at both, is what makes it worth the effort.


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8 replies
  1. tomsonite
    tomsonite says:

    I find it interesting that you include a run, sprints and dynamic stretches in your warm-up…I thought Dr. B was all about just taking 3-6 easy throws then getting to work?

    Reply
    • Martin
      Martin says:

      Dr. B has never given us instructions for warm ups, so most of us do what we did before. My warm up is a modified version of what I did fresh out of high school under coach McAtee. Most people are similar: they start with a run (or, a jog). I think Dylan just slips on his shoes and throws, but he is the exception. The warm up isn’t that important, but if you get a little warm, your throwing session will be more productive and you won’t have to waste as many attempts at the beginning.

      Reply
    • Martin
      Martin says:

      Right now I’m training five days a week (10 total training sessions). I take my rest days on Monday/Thursday now, which makes those days better, but means I’m training both weekend days and have no real complete rest day. I’ll probably revisit the schedule once I’m more settled in here and make it so I have one day a week where I have no training and no work.

      Reply
  2. tomsonite
    tomsonite says:

    Ok, I thought that about warming up since I read that in one of Dane Miller’s accounts of training with Dr. B. Maybe its just for shot putters then?

    Reply
    • Martin
      Martin says:

      Nope, it’s just because Dane was lazy. Seriously though, the point Dane was trying to make is that an intense warm up is a waste of energy and will cause two problems: (1) less energy to focus on throwing; and (2) diminished performances throughout practice. An intense warm up can be good for a competition since it excites the muscles, but the body will fatigue quicker and isn’t able to stay in the excited state for as long of a period. Therefore a low to medium intensity warm up is better for training and technical work. My run is more of a jog, as is the rest of my warm up. While it may be faster than most throwers, I’m also in decent aerobic shape as a carryover from when I ran to lose a lot of weight after high school (I was about 300 lbs. then).

      Reply

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