Entries by Nick Garcia

The Inflection Point

In my last post I talked about the book Only the Paranoid Survive. The central theme is about finding “inflection points.” When you figure out that the situation you are involved with has reached an “inflection point” it is time to change. When do we know its time to change? Author Andrew Grove explains that we need to “figure out who our major competitor is and see if they’re about to change. If there is more then one competitor then there is something significant going on.” When this is realized there are a number of things that Grove suggests you do.

Only the Paranoid Survive

Being that I am from San Jose, California I have always followed our Bay Area sports teams. One of those teams being the Stanford University football team. A number of years ago Stanford was considered one of the worst football teams in all of NCAA Division I football. Then came Coach Jim Harbaugh. There was an immediate effect as soon as Coach Harbaugh took over Stanford football. In the following years Stanford went from one of the worst football teams in Division I to one of the top programs. This obviously intrigued me and led me to read everything available regarding Coach Harbaugh’s coaching style. After I found that he endorsed a book called Only the Paranoid Survive, I immediately purchased it in hopes that it could be applied to my own coaching.

Looking Back at GAIN 2014

From June 17th to June 21st I was fortunate to present at and attend the GAIN Professional Development Yearly Conference at Rice University in Houston, Texas. First off, GAIN stands for Gambetta Athletic Improvement Network. Vern Gambetta is known as the father of functional sports training. (Martin has reviewed his most popular book here). The great thing about Coach Gambetta is that he does not limit himself to being involved with one sport. He is involved with and has had success coaching numerous sports to optimize their athletic development living by the philosophy that you must “Link, Sync, Connect, and Coordinate” the body in order to have optimum sports performance. He has worked with levels ranging from youth swimming clubs to the Chicago White Sox, New York Mets, and Chicago Bulls. He has also worked with elite track athletes, premier soccer teams, rugby teams, and beach volleyball players.

Presentation Topics for GAIN 2014

Back in January I wrote about how I will give several presentations at Vern Gambetta‘s The Gambetta Athletic Improvement Network (GAIN) program this summer. A few weeks ago Vern announced the compete week-long schedule for the event, which will take place from June 17th to 21st. This year’s program will include top track coaches like Vern, Gary Winckler, Vince Anderson, and Steve Magness. Also there will be Oregon strength coach Jim Radcliffe and many other specialists in training, sports medicine, and physical education.

Shot Put Specific Strength Exercises

In addition using heavy shot puts a great way to develop specific strength is through the use of specific developmental exercises. These are exercises that Bondarchuk defines as exercises that use the same muscles, same systems, and parts of the competitive movement.

There are lots of specific developmental exercises you can use for the shot put, but here are 7 exercises I have been using in my own training or with my athletes lately.

GAIN 2014

I first met Coach Vern Gambetta in 2003 at a USATF Level III National Throws Summit in Las Vegas. I was only 23 but when Coach Gambetta spoke I immediately knew how passionate he was about coaching. Not just track and field, but every team, athlete, and sport he had the opportunity to work with. Coach Gambetta’s systematic approach to training is practical and produces great results regardless of the event or sport. He has taken my knowledge and skills to the next level. Whoever has the opportunity to work with him should consider it an extreme privilege.

Finding the Right Weight Implements For Your Throwers

My previous two posts (available here and here) discussed the findings from my graduate school thesis when nine of the top American shot put coaches were surveyed. I would now like to address my thoughts on the findings and how I apply the training theory of using multiple weighted implements. First off, each of the coaches surveyed have had extreme success applying their theories to this training method. What they do has obviously worked for them. Furthermore, the fact that each of these coaches have successfully applied this training theory in different ways is proof that there isn’t just one right way in doing it. Therefore, I needed to come up with my own way of applying this training theory.

How and When Elite Coaches Use Light and Heavy Shots

My first post for HMMR Media laid out how top American shot put coaches choose what weight implements to throw in training. The data came from my master’s thesis on the resistance training methods of elite shot putters, where I asked nine of the top shot put coaches in the USA a wide range of questions. These coaches were chosen based off of the results they had in International Championships, USA National Championships, and NCAA National Championships.

After I asked them what weighted implement they used, the next logical question was to ask how and why they used each one in training. Just as each coach had a different formula for what implements to use, they also had their own approaches to when they would use them.

Training With Multiple Weighted Implements

In Martin’s post from earlier this week he mentioned that coach Jean-Pierre Egger had expanded his rule of not using implement more or less than 10% of the competition weight. With Valerie Adams now uses a range of plus or minus 25%. Larry Judge is one of the few American coaches to write about the topic and he mentions a similar 10% rule, although he noted that it is not uncommon to throw an implement upwards of 20% higher then the competition weight to develop special strength. Is there such a simple rule that can be easily applied to throwing heavy and light implements?

When working on my graduate degree I chose to do my thesis project on just this topic. The final thesis was titled “Resistance Training Methods of Elite Shot Putters” and I asked nine of the top shot put coaches in the USA to participate in the project. These coaches were chosen based off of the results they had in International Championships, USA National Championships, and NCAA National Championships. One of the questions I asked each of these coaches was if they used multiple weighted implements as a means of training. I included this question because using multiple weighted implements for training was widely accepted and at this time there had been very little research done using this training method.