Are you training with a chainsaw or sandpaper?

Swedish speed skater Nils van der Poel was one of the most impressive athletes at last month’s Winter Olympics. After obliterating the field and setting records at both the 5000 and 10000m events, he released a free eBook detailing his training plan and philosophy. One important point he made was in what tools he choose. There is a role for nearly every tool in training, but you have to choose the right tool for the purpose at hand. He used the analogy of a sculptor to get his point across:

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What coaches can learn from watching kids throw

Recently James Marshall wrote about the need to develop general throwing skills before specific throwing skills. The topic of general throwing skills is worth diving more into. Thankfully this is a task that GAIN faculty member and award-winning physical education teacher Greg Thompson has to deal with every day at the primary school level. Watching his teaching progressions can help coaches of all levels in several areas. Below I show two key lessons we can take from Thompson: how advanced coaches can improve their understanding of movement by breaking it down to its basics, and how to balance constraints and cues in teaching movement.

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3 lessons to help find your throw

Throughout the month we’ve been looking at different perspectives on throwing. Normally our throwing content focuses more on training methods, but recently we’ve also been giving special attention to throwing technique. One common theme has appeared over and over with different athletes in different events: the best throwers find a technique that works best for them, rather than chasing a one-size-fits-all technical model. Our recent video lesson on hammer throw technique shares some specific examples of this from the hammer throw. Below are three lessons that athletes in all events can learn from in order to find their own throw.

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A systems approach to hamstring injuries

There is a strange phenomenon when it comes to hamstring injuries. With most other injuries, we tend to point the finger at movement. What caused an ACL tear or shoulder pain? Bad mechanics or the athlete put themselves in a bad position. But what caused the hamstring injury? Weakness most often gets the blame. Why do we think about hamstring injuries differently? Could a change in mindset help us reverse the concerning hamstring injury trends in many sports?

Systems vs reductionist thinking

For some reason we tend to take a different mindset when it comes to muscle injuries vs. joint injuries. Muscle injuries are often treated with a reductionist approach. Reductionist thinking tries to simplify the process by focusing on specific details. In this view a system is a sum of its parts, therefore fix the parts and you’ll fix the system. What part do we focus on most with muscle injuries? We focus on the part we can measure the easiest: strength. We shouldn’t forget that we need to measure what is important, rather than making something important simply because we can measure it.

A systems approach, on the other hand, takes a holistic perspective. A system is the result of how parts interact. Fixing the system is about understand and optimizing those interactions.

When it comes to the ever-growing challenge of hamstring issues a reductionist approach has taken centre stage: hamstrings are getting injured since they are too weak. The solution: make the hamstring stronger and it will no longer break. Rather than fixing the problem this has just created a paradox: we focus more and more on hamstring strength, but the problem keeps getting worse.

Systems approach to the hamstring

Reductionist thinking can work with simple problems. But complex problems and movements demand a more holistic viewpoint. If strength were the answer, then why do strong people always get hurt? More and more research has started to debunk the simple promises of the reductionist approach.

In the niche world of hammer throwing hamstring issues are not prominent, but another reductionist approach is front and center. Many hammer throwers are plagued by low back pain which the reductionist approach blames on poor core strength and stability. While many coaches still hold this view, over the years the myth of core stability has been revealed. Hammer throwers have incredibly core strength, but that doesn’t solve the problem. Why? They are often putting their bodies in awkward positions while requiring it to counter a few hundred kilos of force. Fix the movement and the pain often disappears. It’s time for a similar revolution in thought when it comes to hamstring injuries.

A systems approach would look at the hamstring in the context of the running movement. Sure, the hamstring might be too weak, but perhaps the issue is that we’re putting the hamstring in a position where it’s being required to work at sub optimal lengths. No wonder it breaks.

It’s not that we need to ignore strength. Strength is still one component, but the hamstring debate now seems to be about whether eccentric or isometric hamstring exercises are the best. Or, whether regular exposure to maximum speed sprinting is the cure. All these solutions still use a reductionist approach by focusing on a single factor. That factor might play a role, but it isn’t the solution to every problem. If running mechanics are poor, simply adding more strength or exposure to high intensity running isn’t going to solve that.

The car analogy

To help look at where the reductionist thinking falls short, let’s take it outside of a sporting context. If a car keeps getting into accidents or breaking down, what is the cause? We can’t say without knowing more, right? It could be any number of things: mechanical issues, poor tire pressure, balancing if the wheels, word down brake pads, poor handling, lack of power, etc. A reductionist approach often picks one of those reasons and focuses on it in order to prevent future accidents without ever reading the accident report. 

More often than not, accidents are caused by a complex combination of factors. The driver might be distracted. Once they realize they are in a bad situation the car’s handling is a bit slow to turn away. Then they punch the gas to further evade the issue but there just isn’t enough juice to escape the situation. How do we prevent future accidents in this chaotic environment? It’s complex, but the central element of it all is the driver. The driver controls the system. Want to avoid most accidents? Become a better driver. That means increasing awareness of the surroundings, being defensive to potential threats, knowing how your car responds, and what options you have to work with. You make the system stronger, and you’ll avoid most accidents.

A case study in sprinting

Let’s now look at a systems approach in the context of a common issue with hamstring injuries in field sport athletes. It is becoming widely accepted that there are a few main contributors to soft tissue injury associated with sprinting: pelvic control across multiple planes of movement and collapse of the ankle. However, the most significant issue, especially in field sports, is excessive anterior pelvic tilt. There are a number factors why this occurs at speed. The most common being allowing the leg to spend a disproportionate amount of time behind the body – commonly known as excessive “backside mechanics.” As such, the pelvis has no option, but to rotate forward. This rotation also puts an increased pre-stretch on the hamstring and can contribute to hamstring issues. You can see this in the famous example from Peter Weyand‘s lab comparing the mechanics of a sprinter and a field sport athlete:

A systems approach, on the other hand, also looks beyond strength at improving sprint posture and motor learning. A systems approach asks: why did the athlete have poor lumbo-pelvic control in the first place? Perhaps poor foot strike and in turn, collapse at the ankle resulted in a longer ground contact time. Longer ground contact time caused the foot to trail behind the body. This then has a knock-on effect of the pelvis tilting anteriorly as the next stride begins. Clean up the foot strike and maybe the athlete is never in the compromising position in the first place. Problem solved. Correct force application = good posture. Good posture = correct force application.

Final thoughts

Using a system approach reframes the issue, but it does not solve the problem. In the case study above we might have come to a better answer as to what caused the injury, but we are only part of the way to fixing it. The next question is how to address this in our programming and coaching. Social media is flooded with running drills and apparent solutions for these flaws. Less convincing though, is witnessing the practical applications of these solutions. More often than not it is just pseudo training activity; lots of movement without any direction. A systems approach also needs a systems solution where the training precision, intensity, and complexity are all prescribed specifically to the task at hand using sound teaching concepts.

The solution isn’t always this easy, but the example shows how a change in mindset from reductionist to systems–from muscles to movements–can help reframe the problem and open up new possible solutions. Unfortunately, we aren’t hearing this side of the discussion in the hamstring debates, but it’s time for that to change. 

7 lessons on team speed

Throughout October and November we posted a variety of content about team speed. With the chance to talk to so many experts on the topic, I’ve been thinking about it a lot myself as well. Below are some key lessons I’ve learned or reemphasized recently on getting athletes faster in team sports.

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The speed grid and training speed in a large group setting

Coach Kelvin Giles once said “If your coach:athlete ratio is 1:25 then you are managing a crowd, not coaching.” It’s not ideal, but it’s reality for many coaches. As I’ve worked more with field sports I’m often tasked with working with up to 50 athletes at one time. In such a setting, you have to make concessions as you transition from theory to practice. But with the right adjustments it can still look like coaching rather than crowd management.

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Better speed through posture

We all know of teams can be faster than a sum of their parts. Team speed is about way more than the speed of each individual player. A bunch of average players can truly sync up in extraordinary ways. But whenever I watch such a team play I always wonder how they would fare against a group of faster individuals that sync up in just the same way. We can appreciate the way they work together, but let’s not forget they can still get faster.

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Remembering Jüri Tamm

I remember the first time I saw video of Jüri Tamm throw the hammer. A big round man with a mustache and a fluffy head of hair lumbered into the ring. Compared to his compatriots Yuriy Sedykh and Sergey Litvinov, he seemed to move like a sloth through the circle. His feet flailed around as he completed three turns. It wasn’t the prettiest throw until the hammer left his hand and it flew. And kept flying. And kept flying. Tamm, who passed away on Thursday, set the world record and won two Olympic medals. His best mark is still among the top 10 all-time. Yet still, when I watch him throw, I can’t help but think: what did I just see?

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Individualize the delivery, not the program

Ask me 10 years ago about the key to successful coaching and it was all about individualization. Ask me now, and I think most coaches individualize too much. Maybe I’m just getting set in my ways, but the longer I coach the more I see individualization as simply the icing on the cake. It’s nice to have and can make all the difference, but the true substance is the program underneath it.

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Simplifying training with weightlifting complexes

Training is often thought of in terms of exercises. Exercises might be the building blocks of training, but as Vern wrote about today, it isn’t about the exercise. Good programs stand out more from the continuity and progression between each exercises. They look at the synergies created by exercises rather than how an exercise works in isolation.

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