Tag Archive for: Biomechanics

A systems approach to calf complex injuries

At beginning of this year we penned our thoughts on the hamstring injury phenomena and illustrated how a reductionist approach to reducing hamstring injuries just doesn’t work. A complex problem can’t be solved by something as simple as getting stronger; it demands a more holistic interpretation. Below we turn our attention to a similar injury trend: injuries to the calf complex.

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HMMR Podcast Episode 283: Going out on top (with Kara and Russ Winger)

Kara Winger has been the top American javelin thrower for 15 years. This season was her last, and she went out in style. Her season highlights included a world number 1 ranking, Diamond League title, World Championships silver medal, and an American record. She joins us on this week’s podcast with her husband and coach Russ Winger to discuss what made this season such a success.

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HMMR Podcast Episode 259: Speed in context (with Jonas Dodoo)

Sprinting on the track and sprinting on the field use the same blueprint. The key differences lie in how that blueprint is applied to a different context. On this week’s podcast speed coach Jonas Dodoo draws upon his experience helping elite players in nearly every sport get faster to explain the impact of the blueprint and the context on how you train speed.

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Analyzing the Olympic 100-meter sprints

As always, the whole world was focused on athletics this summer at the Tokyo Olympics took place. Within the athletics program, the men’s and women’s 100 meters were the in the spotlight. Behind the historic performances is a treasure trove of data that helps look in more detail at the event, learn about it, and identify the latest trends in sprinting. Below are some insights on overall performance levels, how well maximum velocity and acceleration correlate, top speed, speed loss, race modeling, and more.

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HMMR Podcast Episode 256: Throwing trends (with Don Babbitt)

The dust has settled following Tokyo, giving us time to analyze the most recent trends in our sport. It’s not just a question of who is hot and who is not, but how current throwers are adapting and changing technique to reach new levels. On this week’s podcast coach Don Babbitt joins us to look at the technical trends in the throws that emerged in Tokyo.

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GAINcast Episode 223: Limitations on speed

What is keeping us from going faster? Ironically, a lot of times it is what we are doing rather than what we aren’t doing. What we other think is helping our speed can be counterproductive. On this week’s GAINcast we discuss some concepts that might be limiting your speed training, as well as methods and planning tips for getting faster.

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March 2021 in review: speed training

The site theme in March was speed. This isn’t the first time we looked in depth on speed, with site themes from 2019 and 2018 also focusing on the topic. This time we tried to learn more from the world of sprinting with 6 new articles, 3 podcasts, and 2 new videos that looked at topics ranging from sprint mechanics to technical progressions to training methodology. Below we have links to all our new and archived content on speed.

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GAINcast Episode 212: Speed to the max

We’ve been exploring speed training this month on both the GAIN Master Class and HMMR Media site. On this week’s GAINcast we share our own thoughts on sprinting, including some recurring themes that have come up this month around mechanics, resisted sprint training, planning, and more.

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GAINcast Episode 194: The trailblazer (with Betty Atwater)

Sports biomechanics came to age in the 1960s and 1970s with scientists like Betty Atwater at the forefront of this new field. A lot has changed in sports science over the last 50 years, but many of the foundational findings still hold and there is a lot we can learn from the analytical and technical processes used by the trailblazers of biomechanics. On this week’s GAINcast Atwater joins to discussion some of her landmark research on pitching and sprinting, as well as the work that led to it. Read more

History is alive

It is so important to know history, especially in today’s climate of instant information. Historical context is all important. Many training concepts and methods being practiced and promoted commercially are 50, 60, 70 years old or even older. Historical perspective gives a clearer direction on what you are doing now or what you are planning to do. Certainly, we can learn how these concepts and methods were previously used, what worked and what did not work and most importantly why. Often these methods fell out of favor for various reasons, it is helpful to know why. History can tell us that. Understanding those reasons will help us to avoid repeating mistakes. Read more