Tag Archive for: Book Reviews

Vern Gambetta’s top 10 reads of 2023

I am a confirmed bibliophile. I cannot walk by a bookstore without going in and browsing and frequently buying a book. My reading does not follow fixed patterns. It is driven by my curiosity, and the desire to learn new things. My reading is not focused on sports, coaching or training. You can see from my top ten list that it is quite eclectic.

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Craig Pickering’s top reads of 2023

2023 was exhausting! Already a dad to a toddler (who went through a stage of waking up overnight and refusing to go back to sleep), my wife and I added a second child to our brood back in October. Suffice to say, I haven’t had the time or energy to read as much this year as previous years, but I still managed to sink my teeth into some books that have had a big impact on me. Here are my best picks from this year:

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A regular and reliable resource: The Universal Traveler

The Universal Traveler is a resource I refer to periodically. In preparation for GAIN 2023 I reviewed it again because of its application to the theme: “Investing in the Process.” There is no better guide to the process.

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GAINcast Episode 259: Top books of 2022

Vern is a notorious reader on a wide range of topics. On this week’s GAIN cast he looks back at his top books of 2022, breaking down more than 20 titles for listeners.

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2022 year in books

2022 was a good year for reading. Below are my top ten books for the year. It is an eclectic collection that reflects my varied interests and curiosity.

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Craig Pickering’s top reads of 2022

At the end of every year, I do a quick look back on the books I read over the preceding 12 months. This year is no different and my favorite books of 2022 are listed below. However one thing has changed over time: the older I get, the less time (or less energy) I dedicate to reading, Therefore I’ve become much more likely to give up on a book that isn’t holding my attention or interest. Author Ryan Holiday has a simple rule of thumb; if a book hasn’t drawn you in by the page number of 100 minus your age (in my case, page 74), then you should stop. Great readers, he adds, learn to quit books that aren’t very good. Taking this rule to heart, this year, I read 44 books. This is less than in other years, but a couple were month-long reads that took up a lot of time.

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GAINcast Episode 233: Top books of 2021

Vern is a notorious reader and he’s only gaining steam with age. This year he had 151 books on this week’s podcast he shares some key takeaways from his 17 favorite books of the year.

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Craig Pickering’s top reads of 2021

On a personal level, 2021 was a big year for me, as I became a father. Anyone who has had a baby will know there isn’t much time (or energy) for doing much else aside from working, looking after them, and recovering. For me, this was a double-edged sword; it meant I didn’t have the time or energy to read quite as much as before, but, from a positive side, I became much, much better at giving up on a book, or skipping sections that weren’t interesting to me. Whereas before I might have preserved, now I discard.

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Vern Gambetta’s 2021 reading recommendations

In 2021 I have read 151 books. I never set out to read a certain number, rather I just enjoy reading. I total the number at the ned of the year out of curiosity. I read for professional development, intellectual growth and pleasure. Holding a real book and turning the pages is a great felling.

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Eric Hoffer: the true believer

If you want insights and a deeper understanding of what is happening today this book is a must read. It was first published in 1952. I first read it for a class in college in the mid 1960’s. He is one of my intellectual heroes. As a college student I devoured everything he wrote. Eric Hoffer, the author resists classification. He had no formal education beyond early elementary school. He was migrant worker for many years and then a longshoreman in San Francisco. He was self-educated, having spent all his free time in public libraries reading history and philosophy.

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