Tag Archive for: Overload

Developing explosive power with creative solutions for eccentric overload

For decades research has shown numerous benefits for pure strength, speed, and power athletes. Practically speaking, however, it is not always easy to implement eccentric work into training. Achieving eccentric overload with traditional strength training is a pain. Having multiple spotters or adjusting weight releasers are typical forms of accentuating the eccentric phase during compound exercises like the squat or bench press. But the complications involved in eccentric training have left it as an afterthought to many coaches. Advances in flywheel and other technologies are starting to not only make eccentric training more accessible, but allow for new methods of eccentric training. Below I will overview eccentric training, its key benefits, and then share some ideas on how to achieve it using flywheel devices.

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HMMR Podcast Episode 174: Training Q&A

You ask and we answer. On this week’s episode we open the mailbag and answer listener questions on topics like microcycles, favorite exercises, key factors outside of training, overload, lessons learned, and more. Read more

Specificity of resistance training for sprinting

It is well accepted that training exercises must have similar characteristics to a competition movement to achieve a direct positive transfer of training. This is not to say that all training must be specific, as general training is important for developing foundation qualities, and for injury prevention. It is also well-known that developing athletes with a relatively low strength training age can achieve good transfer to performance without highly specific training exercises. But, nevertheless, this statement is a good starting point when looking at exercise selection for any sport that involves sprinting movements. Read more

Fundamental Training Principles – A Review

These are the principles upon which a sound program is based. You MUST observe these principles to achieve optimum adaptation to training. They are very basic and fundamental. Read more