Tag Archive for: Speed

Sports Science Monthly – April 2018

In the April edition of Sports Science Monthly we look at new research across a variety of areas including the best time of day to train, dietary supplements, asymmetries in sprinting, monitoring external and internal loads, workload injury relationship, and more. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 149: Zen and the art of training (with Steve Myrland)

In some ways, training is about the constant pursuit of staying focused. Coaches can help in this regard. It isn’t just about telling athletes to focus; it’s also about what exercises you choose, how training is structured, and what tools are used. On this episode of the podcast Steve Myrland joins us to discuss mindfulness in training, finding focus, and rethinking the barbell. Read more

More than a gene for speed: what ACTN3 can teach us about muscle

If it’s possible to have a favorite gene, mine is ACTN3, often referred to as the speed gene. But to me it is interesting for more reasons than speed; after all top sprinters have been found to have different variants of the the gene. What is most interesting about it is that it impacts muscle function and architecture. As a result, this one gene can have a large impact on exercise adaptation, post-exercise recovery, and injury risk. Read more

Training speed in

Let not overcomplicate this. You coach speed into the athlete by training speed at the appropriate time in the workout, using an appropriate method and dosage for the time of the training year. You train speed out by doing all sorts of general nonspecific work and slow “base building” type of work, in short emphasizing volume. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – March 2018

In the March edition of Sports Science Monthly we look at new research across a variety of areas including the impact of coaching behavior, Selye’s General Adaptation Syndrome, nordic hamstring exercises, genetic testing, monitoring fatigue and more. Read more

Searching for transfer in Fiji

Earlier this month I wrote that transfer is not as straightforward as it seems, even with something as simple as linear speed. In response, some coaches, such as rugby coach John Pryor, have rethought their approach to training speed and strength. Pryor is currently the head of strength and conditioning for Fiji in the lead-up to next year’s World Cup. We’ve written several times about his approach to training speed, and he’ll cover the topic again at GAIN 2018 in June, but a few weeks ago I had a chance to talk to him about the process that got him there. Read more

Does off-field speed transfer to on-field speed?

This month’s theme on HMMR Media is transfer of training, and to kick it off I thought I would take a timely example of just how complex transfer can be. What you think has carry over to your sport is not always as simple as it seems. Read more

Two great sprinters

Two great sprinters died within weeks of each other in the fall of 2017. You would have be close to my age and a real track nut to know who they were. These two sprinters had a huge influence on my interest in speed and how to get people to run faster. Their best years came within a four-year span from 1961 to 1965. Both were small in stature, if you saw them in street clothes you would never guess they were world class athletes. Their small stature disguised incredible power and explosiveness. Neither ever lifted weights. One was white and one was African American. They were both linked to the great Bob Hayes. Hayes was the physical opposite of both of them. Read more

Looking back on 2017: top training resources

Last year was a busy one for HMMR Media. Throughout the course of 2017 we produced over 100 podcasts, over 300 articles, and 14 premium videos from our team of expert coaches and distinguished guests. To help you sort through all the great content, we’ve assembled our top 25 articles, 10 podcasts, and 5 videos from the year. If you want more, you can browse our archives and also check out our top posts from 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – November 2017

This month, we start with a lengthily mini-review, looking at gaining a fuller understanding of how exercise causes adaptation. This is obviously paramount to coaches, because causing adaptations is what we’re interesting in; being able to understand the underpinnings of this can be useful. It gets a little heavy in places, but keep going and I’m sure you’ll find something useful within it. After that, we move back into the regular format; this month, we have a closer look at massage, repeated sprints as a marker of hamstring rehabilitation status, and the 24-hour athlete, along with a rapid-fire round-up at the end. Read more