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GAINcast Episode 241: Jump assessment (with Warren Young)

Over the last several decades Professor Warren Young has been at the forefront of redefining how coaches test jumping ability, reactive strength, and agility. The tools he developed, such as the reactive strength index, have helped coaches better measure and train the physical abilities needed in their sport. He joins us on this week’s podcast to discuss his career, best practices for assessment, and how to bridge the gap from testing to training design.

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Sports Science Quarterly – Q2 2022

Every quarter we take a deep dive into the latest research in sports science. In this edition we look at coaching coaches, hamstring injuries, 100-meter race profiling, leadership, sports psychology, and more.

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GAINcast Episode 240: The sports sciences

When we used to think about sports science we would think about the sports sciences: fields like biomechanics and exercise physiology. Now, more often than note, the term sports science is shorthand for data collection and analysis. On this week’s GAINcast we look at how coaches can go back to the roots and get the most from science in sport.

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GAINcast Episode 236: Learning to move (with Rob Gray)

The world of motor learning is often populated by complex jargon and impenetrable concepts. But at its root it is about something simple: learning to move. Professor Rob Gray is one of the world’s best in translating these concepts into terms we all can use. On this week’s podcast he joins us to help coaches understand non-linear pedagogy, constraints-led approach, repetition in training, feedback, and more.

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January 2022 in review: the hamstring

Our site theme last month was the hamstring. With all of our year-end posts we did not dedicate as many new resources to the topic as we would in a normal month, but it’s about quality not quantity. Our article on a systems approach to the hamstring was one of our most popular of the last year. Below are all of our new and archived content on the topic.

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What is sports science?

What I see today with the use of this generic term “sports science” being thrown around alarms me. I see so called “sports scientists” directing programs, making crucial decisions on athlete’s trainability based on algorithm derived numbers telling coaches that athletes cannot practice because they are too tired or too sore. Many so-called sports scientists have little or no practical experience outside of academia or some sterile training center environment where they have no real athletes to work so they can sit around theorize all day.

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Sports Science Quarterly – Q1 2022

For the last 6 years we’ve delivered you insights into the latest sports science research every month. For 2022 we’re making a little change: our sports science updates will be released on a quarterly basis. Below is our first update of the year, where we look at lessons on briefing and debriefing from the military, the coach’s eye, working with Gen Z, foam rolling, and more.

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Looking back on 2021: top training resources

If I had to chose one word to define 2021 it would be chaos. If I had to choose another word, it would be growth. Through all the chaos HMMR Media saw a lot of growth this year: personal growth, educational growth, as well as new members and new content on the site. In 2020 our 35 contributors produced 52 podcast episodes, 176 articles, 9 premium video lessons, 10 monthly themes, 3 training programs, 48 research article summaries in our Sports Science Monthly, and dozens of new exercises to our movement library.

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December 2021 in review: sports science

Our final site theme of 2021 was sports science. Throughout December we looked at what we can learn from the latest findings, plus how coaches can best integrate and analyze sports science research. Find links to both our new and archived resources on sports science below.

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Sports science: moving beyond numbers

We are taught in school that math is objective. There is no debating it: 1 plus 1 equals 2. The problem comes when math meets the real world. Many people assume math is just as objective and give deference to any approach that uses number. But the chaos of the real world makes it difficult to rely on numbers with precision. This is the same in coaching.

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