Tag Archive for: Sports Science

Is there any there there?

Learn to look beyond the hype, the marketing, the promotion and see what is really there. What is the substance? Evidence-based? Where is the evidence? Is there practice to back up the evidence? What is their body of work? What is the why? Read more

PUSH Band Giveaway Winner

Last month we solicited entries for a giveaway of a PUSH band velocity measurement device. To enter, podcast listeners simply had to send us an email with a description of how they would use a PUSH band. After some time to review the entries, Nick and I have are happen to announce Cal State-Fullerton masters student and assistant strength coach Arjan Dougan as the winner. Read more

Should Athletes Have Ice Baths?

We’ve all been there. Stood over the bath (or bin), full of ice, psyching ourselves up to get in and endure the minute of cold in order to improve our recovery. Read more

Vern Gambetta

The Coaching Process

Coaching is a process that has a firm foundation in pedagogy (practice of teaching), supported by science, forged in experience, proven and tested in the competitive arena. Part of the process is maintaining a delicate balance between pedagogy, science, experience and ultimately the results in the competitive arena. Read more

Becoming a Better Consumer of Sports Science

I’ve written extensively over the past few weeks about the scientific process, methods, and study design. All of this has an effect on the results. But we also need to look at a few other aspects that impact our understanding of the results. In other words, we need to ask how we can become better consumers of scientific research. For that I have a few tips that can help with interpreting scientific findings. Read more

Critical Elements for Effective Sports Science

Earlier this month I have discussed the scientific process and how to interpret results, but at some point we also have to look at whether the process that brought about the results was valid in the first place. In my last article, I discussed a study looking at HMB supplementation and explained how the fact that the subjects included no females and no trained athletes limited what conclusions could be drawn from the findings and applied to larger populations of people. But there was another larger issue with the study design: the study had no control group. Read more

Words of Wisdom, Volume 4

Our new author Craig Pickering has brought together his background as an Olympic sprinter, coach, and sports scientist to start a series on understanding science for coaches. His latest post covers the differences between good and bad sports science articles and is well worth a read.

It has been months since my last “Words of Wisdom” post and I’ve read a lot since then. So to keep with the theme of sports science and data collection I pulled out a few quotes related to the topic from mostly non-athletic sources. Read more

The Difference Between Good and Bad Sports Science Articles

Last week I wrote about the scientific process, and what a scientific research paper entails. In this article we will take a closer look at some issues we need to consider when evaluating the results of a given study. Taking results at face value can sometimes be misleading, as we will see. Read more

Understanding Science For Coaches & Trainers

In recent years, coaching has become increasingly science led. Where once coaching was primarily about designing a training programme, knowing the correct technique (as taught to you by someone else) and getting results, in today’s world the coach has an increasing number of responsibilities. The internet has further allowed discussion on all factors of training, the result of which is that the modern coach is expected by his or her athletes to be up to date with the latest training research, periodization, strength training methods, nutrition, recovery modalities, and biomechanical factors affecting technique, to name but a few. Read more

Vern Gambetta

Bridging the Gap

We have been talking about bridging the gap between science and practice in sport for thirty plus years. You have to ask yourself with all we know today why is there still a gap? In fact in many ways with the drive toward more “sport science” the gap has widened with coaches and coaching being marginalized. Read more