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HMMR Podcast Episode 154: Force and velocity (with JB Morin)

Strength, power and speed are all related, but the relationship is more complex than it seems. Leading sports scientist JB Morin has dedicated his research to finding out more about the relationship, what coaches can learn from it, and how that can make training better. On this week’s episode of the podcast, he joins us to discuss force-velocity profiling, transfer of training, and many more aspects of getting faster. Read more

The importance of sprinting in injury rehabilitation

Start talking about sprinting and it won’t be long until you the discussion turns to hamstring injuries. Hamstring injuries are a major concern of any athlete that has to sprint. Soccer has a notorious hamstring problem, but they are not alone. Hamstring injuries are also the most prevalent form of non-contact injury within sports like athletics, American Football, rugby union, Australian Rules Football, cricket, and basketball. Read more

HMMR Podcast Episode 153: Sprinting myths (with Brian FitzGerald)

When it comes to high school sprinting, few can match the credentials of Brian FitzGerald. The 2016 USA Today national track coach of the year has led athletes to California state titles in each of the past four decades, including athletes named Athlete of the Year by Track and Field News. When coaching beginners it is important to know the basics. It is also important to know the myths that people wrongly pass off as the basics. On this episode FitzGerald dispels some of those myths and explains his five-step approach to teaching sprint mechanics. Read more

GAINcast Episode 115: Train speed in

Much of what is called speed training has the opposite effect of what we want. Rather than training speed in, things like wind sprints simply train speed out. You have to express speed in a climate of fatigue, but you don’t develop it in a climate of fatigue. On this episode of the GAINcast, Vern discusses his approach to training speed for team sports, balancing different types of speed training, and examples of how micro doses of speed work can work wonders. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – April 2018

In the April edition of Sports Science Monthly we look at new research across a variety of areas including the best time of day to train, dietary supplements, asymmetries in sprinting, monitoring external and internal loads, workload injury relationship, and more. Read more

Training speed in

Let not overcomplicate this. You coach speed into the athlete by training speed at the appropriate time in the workout, using an appropriate method and dosage for the time of the training year. You train speed out by doing all sorts of general nonspecific work and slow “base building” type of work, in short emphasizing volume. Read more

Sports Science Monthly – November 2017

This month, we start with a lengthily mini-review, looking at gaining a fuller understanding of how exercise causes adaptation. This is obviously paramount to coaches, because causing adaptations is what we’re interesting in; being able to understand the underpinnings of this can be useful. It gets a little heavy in places, but keep going and I’m sure you’ll find something useful within it. After that, we move back into the regular format; this month, we have a closer look at massage, repeated sprints as a marker of hamstring rehabilitation status, and the 24-hour athlete, along with a rapid-fire round-up at the end. Read more

GAINcast Episode 89: How Speed Happens (with Peter Weyand)

There are some basic questions out there that are difficult to answer, such as what limits human running speed. As technology advances, scientists can better study and start to answer this and other simple questions like what makes one athlete faster than another. Dr. Peter Weyand has spent decades researching locomotion on both animals and humans. His work with elite sprinters has brought some interesting conclusions and is driving the field forward. On this episode of the GAINcast he joins us to discuss his research and its practical implications. Read more

Why Did Usain Bolt Lose?

Athletics fans love statistics, and I’m no different, which is why it was so exciting to hear that the IAAF and Leeds Becket University were to collaborate on a biomechanics project at the recent World Championships, giving us some insight into what makes up a world class performance in athletics. As the Championships finished last weekend, the first initial reports were released for the men’s 100m and 10,000m, men’s discus final, and women’s pole vault final, which you can find here. The extended analysis will come in time, but the initial analysis does contain plenty of interesting bits of information. As my athletics knowledge is primarily limited to the sprints, that is where I’ll focus. The initial report itself does a great job of presenting the pertinent points, but I hope to add a little extra context where possible. Read more

Basic Speed Drills

It is only March and last week we already launched our fourth e-course of the year. Earlier this year we posted videos on periodization and planning trends, multi-jump progressions, and medicine ball routines. You can find them all and more in the HMMR Classroom. In our newest video, coach Joe McNab explains and demonstrates basic exercises and drills for sprinting. Read more