Posts

Tips to individualize training in a team setting

The expression ‘there is no I in team’ is often used in team sports to suggest that no individual’s needs, abilities or ideas should take precedence over the combined skills and efforts of the entire group. From a team culture perspective, I would tend to agree with this saying. However, the core principle of individualization also suggests that coaching and training should be based on the athlete’s actual state of training, experience, athletic potential, and characteristics. Research has clearly shown standardized training program will produce a wide range of adaptive responses, with the same training producing large, small or negative responses among different athletes. How is a coach to deal with these seemingly contradictory points?

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GAINcast Episode 220: Love and coaching (with Jerry Lynch)

Great coaches have one thing in common that we don’t talk about much: the demonstrate love in their coaching. You hear about passion, you hear about drive, and you hear about communication, but we often avoid talking about love. Dr. Jerry Lynch has spent his career working at the intersection of sports psychology, leadership, and philosophy. This is where you find many of the hidden topics like love that can be the biggest drivers of performance. On this week’s GAINcast Lynch joins us to share some of his reflections on coaching, self-improvement, and Buddha.

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A practical approach to individualization

To paraphrase Kelvin Giles, ‘If your coach: athlete ratio is 1:25 then you are managing a crowd, not coaching.’ Some coaches can only dream of that ratio because they regularly manage groups of 40 or 50 people in a session. Coaching large groups presents unique problems. For example, individualization may seem impossible and we have to hope that everyone gets some improvement.

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HMMR Podcast Episode 252: Talking shop

We’re trying something new on this week’s podcast. We don’t have a theme or key topic, we just have some friends on to share some ideas and see where the conversation goes. Adam Kuehl, Carrie Lane, and Brek Christensen join us to talk about rethinking peaking, the benefits of hiking for power athletes, the skillset of mid major coaches, and much more.

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Sports Science Monthly – July 2021

Every month we take a deep dive into the latest research in sports science. In this month’s edition we look at the newest frontiers in sport science, the link between energy intake and adaptations, and much more.

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GAINcast Episode 219: Performance teams (with David Martin)

Sports science has changed a lot in the last few decades. In some regards it has grown, but it has also become watered down in many ways. On this week’s GAINcast David Martin joins us to discuss how teams can perfect the performance equation, get the most out of sports science, and lessons from the NBA, cycling, and even Jane Goodall.

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June 2021 in review: Olympic weightlifting

The site theme in June was Olympic weightlifting. Athletic development coaches often debate the role of Olympic lifting in athletic development. But there is one thing we can probably all agree on: athletes need power and Olympic lifting is one tool coaches can use to develop it. Throughout the month we shared a variety of new articles, videos, and podcasts on Olympic lifting looking at how to teach the lifts, programming, complexes, and alternatives. Our archives have even more in depth content on the topic. Below we have links to all our new and archived content on the topic.

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Simplifying training with weightlifting complexes

Training is often thought of in terms of exercises. Exercises might be the building blocks of training, but as Vern wrote about today, it isn’t about the exercise. Good programs stand out more from the continuity and progression between each exercises. They look at the synergies created by exercises rather than how an exercise works in isolation.

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Using microdosing to teach the Olympic lifts

Recently I wrote an article on substitutions and alternatives for the Olympic lifts. Those of you who have not read the article may be asking why would you want any substitutes for Olympic Lifting? Why not just do the Olympic lifts? For some coaches the reason is that they take too much time to teach. For those coaches I have another option for you: microdosing. Teaching the Olympic lifts in small doses means that you don’t take time away from other forms of strength training to learn the basic lifts.

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HMMR Podcast Episode 251: Relearning the lifts (with Wil Fleming)

Many athletes pick up weightlifting as a hobby after retiring from their primary sport. After years of training without proper technique, transitioning to a new sport often requires a step back to relearn technique. That’s exactly what we’ve been struggling with lately. On this week’s episode Wil Fleming joins us to break down our own technique, and shares some ideas on submaximal lifting, variations, complexes, warming up, meet preparation, and much more.

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